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Isn't the necessity of keeping a patient warm always important?  (Although
of course winter conditions may increase the demands on insulation and heat
sources.)  IIRC, when a patient suffers severe trauma and goes into shock
his or her body stops keeping himself or herself warm.  Am I remembering
correctly?

On 7/17/06, McCusker, Brad <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> >Very much the same thing.  Only it takes a lot longer to get them to
> >definitive care, in that someone has to hike out for help and
> >rescue/carry teams have to hike in - unless there're helis available.
>
> Yep, but assuming we are talking about winter situations, keeping the
> patient warm will also be important.  Get them to a protected area (out
> of the wind), if you can. Cover with excess clothing, or other
> coverings.  If the patient is shivering, that is the beginning of
> hypothermia, you need to get them into a situation that stops further
> heat loss, if you can.
>
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-- 
Benjamin Kulas





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