Print

Print


Isn't the necessity of keeping a patient warm always important?  (Although of course winter conditions may increase the demands on insulation and heat sources.)  IIRC, when a patient suffers severe trauma and goes into shock his or her body stops keeping himself or herself warm.  Am I remembering correctly?

On 7/17/06, McCusker, Brad <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>Very much the same thing.  Only it takes a lot longer to get them to
>definitive care, in that someone has to hike out for help and
>rescue/carry teams have to hike in - unless there're helis available.

Yep, but assuming we are talking about winter situations, keeping the
patient warm will also be important.  Get them to a protected area (out
of the wind), if you can. Cover with excess clothing, or other
coverings.  If the patient is shivering, that is the beginning of
hypothermia, you need to get them into a situation that stops further
heat loss, if you can.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html



--
Benjamin Kulas





caveat lector
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html