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I find as I get older, I think about this more and more.
This is one of the reasons I am hesitant about doing some of the 
night adventures.  I would feel more comfortable about doing night skiing
in bounds, but night skiing BC is pushing it a bit.    Something happens,
you are screwed.   It could be pretty hard to lead rescuers back to the
injured.  Maybe when cell phone sevice improves and people bring their 
GPS. . .



On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 14:28:36 -0400, Jumpin_Jimmy <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>I had the chance to help the South Hero Rescue on friday. The 70 year-old,
>250 lb man had fallen down a steep set of concrete stairs...he had a
>compound nasty fracture of his leg by his ankle and his face was badly cut
>up. This guy was hurting big time, what with his bones sticking out of his
>leg and his head wrapped up like a mummy---and he was still at the bottom
>of a cliff with only a steep set of stairs to go up.
>
>My dad (an MD) helped the EMTs deal with his injuries...I was there to help
>get the injured man up the stairs once we had put him on a backboard and
>into the cradle. It took a good hour for the resue to show, to get him
>stable, and extract him up from the bottom of the stairs.
>
>The question is, what do we do when someone gets hurt like that in the BC?
>
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