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On 8/30/06, Scott Danis <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Not exactly.  Mine was a torn labram, the padding between the ball and
> socket of the shoulder.  A rotator cuff tear can be one of 4 tendons making
> sort of a harness around the shoulder.  Weakness, pain and immobility are
> the symptoms.  Nasty tears unchecked may form scar tissue, making
> reconstructive surgery impossible and pain/damage permanent.  Physical
> therapy is the least cost solution and would be my first choice(as it was
> with my shoulder, but they shook their heads and sent me to the
> surgeon/sports medicine doc saying they couldn't help).  From what I've
> heard, recovery from a torn rotator cuff is more painful but shorter than my
> sort of thing.  It took me 18 weeks before I had the green light.  The
> looseness and pain are history, but the clicking and popping is a little
> louder.  Probably from the hardware.
>

What does a torn labrum feel like, if you can describe it?  What made
you decide to see an MD or PT?  Pain?  Where?  Shoulder feeling out of
place?  Weakness?

My apologies for all the questions.

Later I asked, TEO responded and then Scott said:

> >
> >> 3) Anyone with experience with avulsion fractures? As I understand
> >> them, it's when ligaments withstand a traumatic event better than
> >> bone, and the bone "pulls away" or fractures from bone before the
> >> ligament tears.  I did this 11 years ago in my ankle in a ski crash,
> >> and it still bothers, especially when I try to do light weight lifting
> >> or any running (which I hardly do because of my back).
> >>
> >> Anyone?
> >
> >No experience necessary.  You'll probably feel this for the rest of
> >your life, unless you have reconstructive surgery, which probably
> >isn't worth it if the pain is not excruciating.  Look at it as God's
> >way of saying that running and weighlifting are bad.
>
> Unless you have had reconstructive surgery.  Then weightlifting is good.
> Downright necessary, even.  However, running is pure evil.
>

I would agree that some kind of lifting/weight bearing exercise is
essential.  I felt that light lifting (squats in a pulley-assisted
machine thing and in a hip sled kind of thing - not of the Renson
linebacker free weight variety) last fall/winter really helped my back
and legs while skiing last season.  I was really careful at the gym
because of my previous back problems.  What I did prevented injury and
kept me fresher and all that.  It was quite a difference, I noticed,
because I had not done it in years in prepping for ski season (many
years ago as a racer, but in later years usually riding my bike or
plyos and stretching, etc.).

And running?  Well, I certainly know what you mean by evil.  I can't
do it regularly for any amount of mileage - just too many injuries.  I
only really do it as interval training on a day "hike" here and
there... and these are usually in Vermont when the skiing is atrocious
or non-existent (T-giving '04 or May '06, for examples)... but I'd
like to do more of it, in similar fashion, if I could.


> >
> >--Matt K.
> >
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