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At 02:07 PM 2/14/2007, you wrote:
>THAT's a critique?
>
>I'm writing about the MOVEMENT, the political parties, the policies .... 
>the things people actually DO.
>
>I'll be glad to issue my critiques from Mt. Olympus about the others, too.
>
>For the record, I began my talk by holding up around 20 or so books that I 
>found to be extremely influential, recommending them to those in the room, 
>including Levins & Lewontin's "The Dialectical Biologist," Brian Tokar's 
>"Earth for Sale" and "Redesigning Life?," Cliff Connor's "A People's 
>History of Science," Chaia Heller's "Ecology of Everyday Life," Evelyn Fox 
>Keller's "A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara 
>McClintock," Jeffrey Smith's "Seeds of Deception," David Noble's "Progress 
>without People: In Defense of Luddism," Jeff St. Clair's "Been Brown So 
>Long It Looked Like Green to Me: The Politics of Nature," and a number of 
>others. I also mentioned Joel Kovel's book and everything by Stephen Jay 
>Gould, as well.
>
>Chutzpah, indeed.
>
>Mitchel

But not a single one of these can be considered classical Marxist 
ecological works. Joel is okay, but is much more Frankfurt than classical 
Marxist. Until you have really spent some time reading Paul Burkett, for 
example, you really haven't been exposed to a rigorous Marxist treatment of 
these questions. Here's a good place to start: 
http://www.monthlyreview.org/1005burkett.htm

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