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I'm relieved. After looking at the data and testimony from Robert that CCD 
is not occurring in NZ (beyond a few losses clearly identified as mite 
infestation, according to the NZ beekeepers assn), it appears to me that DU 
is not implicated.

It looks like it's much more likely that the causative agent is a new type 
of insecticide, of which Bayer's imidacloprid is one whose use has vastly 
increased recently in the US and Europe. This is what I've been looking 
for - evidence of either a new agent or dramatic increase in its 
proliferation (which is why I suspected DU).

Bayer has fiercely opposed regulation of the product, and sued a beekeeper 
association leader in France for disparagement, dismissed by the judge, and 
the Minister of Agriculture withdrew its use as a sunflower treatment.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid_effects_on_bee_population

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_Collapse_Disorder

Excerpt from the above article:
One recently published view is that bees are falling victim to new varieties 
of nicotine-based pesticides;[10] beekeepers in Canada are also losing their 
bees and are blaming neonicotinoid pesticides[citation needed]. To date, 
most of the evaluation of possible roles of pesticides in CCD have relied on 
the use of surveys submitted by beekeepers, but it seems likely that direct 
testing of samples from affected colonies will be needed, especially given 
the possible role of systemic insecticides such as the neonicotinoid 
imidacloprid (which are applied to the soil and taken up into the plant's 
tissues, including pollen and nectar), which may be applied to a crop when 
the beekeeper is not present. The known effects of imidacloprid on insects 
are consistent with the symptoms of CCD;[11][12] for example, the effects of 
imidacloprid on termites include apparent failure of the immune system, and 
disorientation.[citation needed] No detailed studies of toxicity or 
pesticide residue in remaining honey or pollen in failed colonies are yet 
published, however.