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Just love this!!!

and yeah, I'm riding tonite...like most nights...but I'm about 250 miles away.

spectacular weather this week. Enjoy it!

ride Sally ride

-Sh

On Tue, 22 May 2007 08:28:52 -0400, Justin Woods <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:
>
>Weird Nature Poem Formula
>
>Yes, you too can learn the secret of nature poetry by following the easy-to-
>use, step-by-step, line-by-line guide, guaranteed or your money back:
>
>1.  Select a natural object (plant, tree, bird, fern, mushroom, flower,   cloud).
>Write it into a metaphor comparing the natural thing to some abstract idea
>(natural thing = adj. + abstract noun), as in “The Blackburnian Warbler is a
>firey burst of memory.”
>
>2.  Insert a descriptive nature fact from a guide-book.  Take it word for word,
>if it’s interesting—if not, put it in your own words.  (“Voice: very thin and
>wiry.”)
>
>3.  Write 3-5 lines using sensory details, either directly related to your object
>or not.
>
>4.  Try using synesthesia in one or more of those lines—mix senses that
>wouldn’t/shouldn’t go together.  (“I glimpsed the smell of apple pie rising from
>the plate” or “I heard the colors’ trilling.”)
>
>5.  Insert a habitat description from your guide.
>
>6.  Switch locations to something in your memory—and put the natural object
>there—also add some action; have the object doing something.
>
>7.  Have the object say something to you.
>
>8.  Address the natural object directly, using a nickname.
>
>9.  Use some personification or anthropomorphism or the pathetic fallacy (all
>essentially the same thing)—have the object do something you wouldn’t
>ordinarily associate with it.
>
>10.  Insert some love—take one reproductive fact from your guide book.
>
>11.  Return to description/metaphor—compare the object’s visual nature to
>something man-made.
>
>12.  Use the object’s Latin name in a statement.
>
>13.  Return to your original metaphor, but extend it further or twist it.
>
>
>My example:
>
>Warbler Mind
>
>1.     Blackburnian Warbler, firey burst of memory,
>2.     with voice thin and wiry—
>3/4.  his songs taste like a squeaky wheelbarrow,
>        hot to the touch, like a sunburn in spring—
>        he flits through the hemlock against the sky,
>5.     and he ranges so high in the trees
>        that I’ve forgotten what was on the grocery list
>6.     as I range down the produce aisle
>        inspecting pears and oranges.  Then, out of nowhere,
>        he trills from a perch in the cooler section…
>       “Don’t forget the milk, the milk, the milk...”
>7.     O Audubon’s imagination, I catch you
>8.     playing stride piano in the tops of trees
>        like Fats Waller in Ain’t Misbehavin’—
>9.      Breeding male, black and white,
>        displaying his vivid orange throat
>10.    like the Slow sign at a construction site,
>11.    but, Dendroica fusca, it’s only the perception
>        of time that slows in the spaces around you,
>12.    these fleeting memories flickering into view.
>
>
>
>see you on the bike trails (anyone riding today?)
>--justin
>
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