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I caught Michael Moore on Jay Leno and he said one of the people he  
brought with him, a Spanish speaker, went back to the hospital by  
herself
(without the cameras and crew, etc.) and received the same sort of  
treatment that the film crew had received. I imagine she was  
identified as a non-Cuban,
but Moore's point was that she wasn't known to be part of the movie.



On Jul 4, 2007, at 10:32 AM, herb fox wrote:

> Thanks for the post Michael.
>
>
> Does someone know the measures by which Cuba is judged 39th?    
> Without detailed information i assume that 39th is pretty good for  
> a country that has been suffering a 50-yr blockade by the most  
> powerful nation in the world.  Even today a shipment of medical  
> supplies is being held by the US at the US/Canadian border.
>
> An interesting aspect of Ms Wong's review is that after remarking,
> Moore violates the contract between reporter and audience: to tell  
> the truth.
> she later use the quote:
> "The treatment Moore and the rescue workers receive in the film was  
> done specifically for them, because they [the Cubans] knew it would  
> make great propaganda," Dr. Julio Cesar Alfonso, a Miami doctor who  
> practiced medicine in Cuba for four years, said in a June 22  
> interview with The Miami Herald.
> Quoting a Cuban expatriate's interview in the Miami Herald as the  
> single source of contrary information is hardly acceptable  
> journalistic searching for the truth.
>
> Does Moore diminish his effectiveness by some of his practices?  I  
> think so from having seen his previous films.  He doesn't hide his  
> position though.  I would challenge Ms Wong to analyze the fraction  
> of US films that are in fact propaganda in whole or in part and  
> never advertise themselves as such.  Would the US lung cancer rate  
> be so high had not Hollywood promoted smoking in its films, usually  
> for a fee?
>
> herb