Print

Print


Stuart Newman wrote:
> 
> I should have written the "Stokely Carmichael statement" (with quotation
> marks), since while I know for sure that a national leader of the Black Panthers
> made this statement at the Chicago SDS meeting, I should not have been so
> quick to go confirm its attribution to Carmichael.  What I remember were
> reports of outrage and disappointment by SDS and New University Conference
> activists, the quotation of "prone" and the querying, as Eric mentioned, of
> whether "supine" was meant (which seemed naive even at the time), and the
> fact that this statement by a Panther leader was mentioned in numerous
> separate conversations over the next few days.  As I said, I was not at the
> meeting, but I also thought it was Carmichael who made the statement.

It could have been Hampton himself. He was a _really_ impressive person,
but as one of the SDS women at Illinois State said after he had spoken
here, at least some Panthers verged on being sexual fascists. He
impressed us enough that when our son was born the following May, we
named him Mark (as in Mark Clark) Hampton, after the two Panthers the
Cook County States Attorney's office had murdered.

There have always been flaws in any political movement. The Socialist
Party had overt racists (supporters of Jim Crow) among its leadership.
It was the CPUSA in the 1930s that made anti-racism a core part of the
u.s. left -- and as I understand it, the Party did so only under intense
pressure from the Comintern. And there are not very many left heroes
(including women) from the past whose views on women would be acceptable
today. A major point of origin of the "First" Womens movement was the
exclusion of women from participation in the abolitionist movement. And
Mary Wollstonecraft's book has suggestions that what triggered her
revolt was the role women (did not) have in the French Revolution. One
of the numerous sources of the Women's movement of the '70s was a little
experiement at an SDS convention: some woman had a noise meter and kept
track of the relative background noise in the room when men and when
women were speaking.

Carrol