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I have received some comments, but no one said they have seen this behavior. See my last posting for a partial explanation. Also, the pic taken with the flash is the better one.
Solon

Thomas MacNair <[log in to unmask]> wrote: That surely is a prize picture of the hummingbird.  Have you received any 
other comments about it?  I have never seen anything like it before.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "VTBIRD automatic digest system" 

To: 
Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2007 12:00 AM
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2007 to 9 Jul 2007 (#2007-190)


> There are 12 messages totalling 512 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>  1. Prairie Warbler & Fieil Sparrow
>  2. hanging hummer (4)
>  3. Vermont RBA 7-9-07
>  4. In praise of Serviceberries (4)
>  5. In praise of Serviceberries - and hawthorns!
>  6. Don't Make Me Bird Alone...
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 06:12:07 -0400
> From:    "Nancy A. Brown" 
> Subject: Prairie Warbler & Fieil Sparrow
>
> Sunday 7/8/07 at West Rutland Power Line both Prairie Warblers and Field =
> Sparrows were singing.  Both of these species will have second broods.  =
> No sign of the Blue-winged Warbler, started south ward movement?  Saw =
> both Virginia Rail and Sora at the West Rutland Marsh board walk. Rail =
> with worm and young Sora.    The Eastern Meadow Larks at Danby Four =
> Corners are singing and displaying again, time for their second brood. =
> The Bluebird family is also on its second brood.  4 young and male =
> hangout on fence line while mom is incubating.  The Ovenbirds have =
> hatched, three young.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 08:27:01 -0400
> From:    Solon Rhode 
> Subject: hanging hummer
>
> Both on Saturday and Sunday we have observed a hummer hanging upside down 
> on
> the feeder. Yesterday I took photos and then tried to touch the bird,
> whereupon it flew off. It was there for many minutes and appeared to be 
> just
> resting with its head hanging down and tail braced against the feeder.
> Apparently this list will not take jpeg attachments or I could send along 
> a
> good photo.
>
> Has anyone seen this behavior before? We haven't.
>
> Solon and Hira Rhode
> Shaftsbury, VT
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 08:38:05 -0400
> From:    Solon Rhode 
> Subject: Re: hanging hummer
>
> I read all the instructions and learned how to show photos. So here is the
> link to a photo of the hanging hummer.
> http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/munster4/wildlife/DSC_0008_editedLarge.jpg
>
> Solon Rhode
> Shaftsbury, VT
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 09:27:09 -0400
> From:    mary holland 
> Subject: Vermont RBA 7-9-07
>
> *Vermont
>
>
>
> *Statewide
>
> 7.9.07
>
>
>
> *VT0403.06
>
>
>
> This is the Vermont Rare Bird Alert for July 9, 2007 covering the period
> July 2 - 8, 2007.
>
> This week's highlights include a female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER at
> Brattleboro Retreat Meadows on 7/7 and three CASPIAN TERNS on Grand Isle 
> on
> 7/7.
>
> Two GADWALLS were sighted off Grand Isle on 7/3 and 7/6.
>
> Two LEAST BITTERNS responded to recordings played in the cattails at the
> edge of the Connecticut River in Vernon on 7/7, across the river from 
> those
> spotted in Hinsdale, NH.
>
> The last of the five MERLIN chicks fledged from their Middlebury nest on
> 7/5.  A MERLIN was also spotted in Victory Basin on 7/3 and at Northwood
> Park in Rutland Town on 7/5.
>
> A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was present at Lefferts Pond on 7/3.
>
> Two PALM WARBLERS were observed in the Silvio Conte NWR on 7/8.
>
> The Vermont Institute of Natural Science offers natural history trips,
> lectures and programs.  To receive a copy of our program calendar, stop at
> one of our centers, call the office during business hours at 802-359-5000 
> or
> visit the VINS' web site at http://www.vinsweb.org
> .
>
>
>
>            This Vermont birding report is a service of the Vermont
> Institute of Natural Science.  VINS is a non-profit, membership 
> organization
> located in Quechee with a regional center in Manchester.  Founded in 1972,
> VINS' mission is to protect our natural heritage through education and
> research. Your membership supports these goals and this reporting service.
> Updates are typically made on Fridays.  Please report your sightings of 
> rare
> or
>
> unusual birds to VINS, or email reports to [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>            If you have any interesting birds to report, you can send your
> sightings to the RBA via e-mail at:  [log in to unmask]  Or enter your
> sightings on Vermont eBird at http://www.ebird.org/VINS/.
>
>
>
> Mary Holland
>
>
>
> Chris Rimmer
>
>
>
> Kent McFarland
>
>
>
> Roz Renfrew
>
>
>
> Vermont RBA Compilers
>
>
>
> Conservation Biology Department
>
>
>
> Vermont Institute of Natural Science
>
>
>
> 6565 Woodstock Road
>
>
>
> PO Box 1281
>
>
>
> Quechee, VT 05059
>
>
>
> 802-359-5001
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:31:29 -0400
> From:    Dana Rohleder 
> Subject: In praise of Serviceberries
>
> All,
>
> I have mentioned this edible fruit before in several previous posts, but =
> I wanted to pass along an observation that I noted this morning. The =
> genus Amelanchier is a superb source of fruit for birds this time of =
> year. Several species grow native in this area are known by various =
> names such as shadbush, Juneberry, serviceberry, etc. ( =
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serviceberry ).=20
>
> Today, at one instant, I had the following species on the serviceberry =
> trees in my yard: Robin, Chickadee, T. Titmouse, Cedar Waxwing, =
> Goldfinch, Bluebird, P. Finch, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Veery. For =
> some reason this year, the Robin population is down in my yard, which =
> has prolonged the harvest of the berries, as Robins can make short work =
> of the fruit. I've never had a chance to taste a ripe berry because the =
> birds get them first!
>
> If any of you are considering planting some trees, please consider this =
> wildlife-friendly plant. Be forewarned though, rabbits and deer like =
> them too, so for their early years, they will need to be protected.=20
>
> Dana Rohleder
> Port Kent, NY
>
> "I want to appreciate those of you who wear our nation's uniform for =
> your sacrifice."- GW Bush, Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 14, 2005
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:46:19 -0400
> From:    Bonita 
> Subject: Re: hanging hummer
>
> Great picture, Solon.
> B
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Solon Rhode" 
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 8:27 AM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] hanging hummer
>
>
>> Both on Saturday and Sunday we have observed a hummer hanging upside down
>> on
>> the feeder. Yesterday I took photos and then tried to touch the bird,
>> whereupon it flew off. It was there for many minutes and appeared to be
>> just
>> resting with its head hanging down and tail braced against the feeder.
>> Apparently this list will not take jpeg attachments or I could send along
>> a
>> good photo.
>>
>> Has anyone seen this behavior before? We haven't.
>>
>> Solon and Hira Rhode
>> Shaftsbury, VT
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:41:20 -0400
> From:    Kinglet 
> Subject: Re: In praise of Serviceberries
>
> I can "ditto" your comments.  I planted this species several years ago to
> attract birds and, along with a couple hawthorn trees, they attract many
> different species.
>
> Mona Bearor
> So. Glens Falls, NY
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Dana Rohleder" 
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 10:31 AM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] In praise of Serviceberries
>
>
> All,
>
> I have mentioned this edible fruit before in several previous posts, but I
> wanted to pass along an observation that I noted this morning. The genus
> Amelanchier is a superb source of fruit for birds this time of year. 
> Several
> species grow native in this area are known by various names such as
> shadbush, Juneberry, serviceberry, etc. (
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serviceberry ).
>
> Today, at one instant, I had the following species on the serviceberry 
> trees
> in my yard: Robin, Chickadee, T. Titmouse, Cedar Waxwing, Goldfinch,
> Bluebird, P. Finch, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Veery. For some reason 
> this
> year, the Robin population is down in my yard, which has prolonged the
> harvest of the berries, as Robins can make short work of the fruit. I've
> never had a chance to taste a ripe berry because the birds get them first!
>
> If any of you are considering planting some trees, please consider this
> wildlife-friendly plant. Be forewarned though, rabbits and deer like them
> too, so for their early years, they will need to be protected.
>
> Dana Rohleder
> Port Kent, NY
>
> "I want to appreciate those of you who wear our nation's uniform for your
> sacrifice."- GW Bush, Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 14, 2005
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:55:50 -0400
> From:    Dana Rohleder 
> Subject: Re: In praise of Serviceberries
>
> Mona,
>
> Yes, an advantage of Hawthorn and Mountain Ash is that the fruit tends to 
> be
> inedible until later in winter - which can be an important source of 
> nutrition to
> the birds when few other sources are available.
>
> Dana
>
> On Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:41:20 -0400, Kinglet  wrote:
>
>>I can "ditto" your comments.  I planted this species several years ago to
>>attract birds and, along with a couple hawthorn trees, they attract many
>>different species.
>>
>>Mona Bearor
>>So. Glens Falls, NY
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 11:15:53 -0400
> From:    John Snell 
> Subject: Re: In praise of Serviceberries
>
> ...but a benefit of service berry is that you can eat them too (IF
> you can beat the birds to them); they are delicious!
> John
> Montpelier
>
>>Mona,
>>
>>Yes, an advantage of Hawthorn and Mountain Ash is that the fruit tends to 
>>be
>>inedible until later in winter - which can be an important source of
>>nutrition to
>>the birds when few other sources are available.
>>
>>Dana
>>
>>On Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:41:20 -0400, Kinglet  wrote:
>>
>>>I can "ditto" your comments.  I planted this species several years ago to
>>>attract birds and, along with a couple hawthorn trees, they attract many
>>>different species.
>>>
>>>Mona Bearor
>>>So. Glens Falls, NY
>>>
>
>
> -- 
> Thermally yours,
>
> John
> ASNT NDT Level III #48166
> Snell Companies
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> that you have received this transmittal in error, please notify Snell
> immediately at 802-229-9820, or by email, reply to the sender and
> destroy the transmittal and any and all attachments.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 11:27:21 -0400
> From:    Kinglet 
> Subject: Re: In praise of Serviceberries - and hawthorns!
>
> Yes!  I wait every  Feb/March for those roaming bands of Cedar Waxwings to
> stop by and devour all the Hawthorn fruits.  In Spring the Hawthorns 
> always
> seem to attract warblers.  This year I enjoyed a pair of Common
> Yellowthroats, several Magnolias, and a number of Nashvilles, Yellows and
> Yellow-rumps - all enjoying the hawthorns.  I planted them years ago 
> because
> I had read that they were a perfect bird tree - in addition to the fruits,
> the branching is usually at a 45 degree angle - great for nest structures,
> and the thorns keep out predators.  Interestingly, I've never had a bird
> nest in one and the Sharp-shinned Hawk uses the Hawthorn to perch and 
> survey
> my yard for lunch often on winter mornings!  They are a bird magnet for
> sure.
>
> Mona Bearor
> So. Glens Falls, NY
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Dana Rohleder" 
> To: 
> Sent: Monday, July 09, 2007 10:55 AM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] In praise of Serviceberries
>
>
> : Mona,
> :
> : Yes, an advantage of Hawthorn and Mountain Ash is that the fruit tends 
> to
> be
> : inedible until later in winter - which can be an important source of
> nutrition to
> : the birds when few other sources are available.
> :
> : Dana
> :
> : On Mon, 9 Jul 2007 10:41:20 -0400, Kinglet  wrote:
> :
> : >I can "ditto" your comments.  I planted this species several years ago 
> to
> : >attract birds and, along with a couple hawthorn trees, they attract 
> many
> : >different species.
> : >
> : >Mona Bearor
> : >So. Glens Falls, NY
> : >
> :
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 15:36:35 -0400
> From:    "BUTLER, Bridget" 
> Subject: Don't Make Me Bird Alone...
>
> Come join me on our monthly monitoring walk at the Green Mountain Audubon 
> C=
> enter this Friday from 7 am to 9 am. Rumor has it a CANADA WARBLER, has 
> bee=
> n hanging out on the monitoring route this past week. You wanna know 
> where.=
> ..don't make me bird alone!
>
> The Green Mountain Audubon Center is located on Sherman Hollow Road in 
> Hunt=
> ington. We meet on the front porch of the main office for the walk. 
> Conside=
> r making it a half-day bird geek adventure and visit the Birds of Vermont 
> M=
> useum up the road after the walk!
>
> See you Friday!
> Bridget
>
> Bridget Butler
> Audubon Vermont
> Conservation Education Coordinator
> 255 Sherman Hollow Road
> Huntington, VT 05462
> 802-434-3068
> www.vt.audubon.org
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Listen to BEEKS-A Birding Geek's Radio Delight online at 
> www.vt.audubon.org=
> !
> Look for the animated two-headed bird on our homepage.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 9 Jul 2007 19:02:23 -0400
> From:    Solon Rhode 
> Subject: Re: hanging hummer
>
> The bird returned for the 3rd day in a row. This time I was able to use a
> flash to bet better illumination.
> http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v334/munster4/wildlife/hanginghummer3.jpg
>
> Although it will let you approach quite closely with a camera, any attempt
> to touch the bird and it promptly buzzes off. It appears to be a juvenile 
> to
> me. I hope this odd behavior is not the result of disease.
> Solon
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 8 Jul 2007 to 9 Jul 2007 (#2007-190)
> *********************************************************** 


 
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