On 7/3/07, Miguel Naughton <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
On Tue, 3 Jul 2007 15:46:01 -0400, Evan Osler <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>The internal combustion engine is horribly inefficient relative to an
>electric motor and battery. Shifting the location of energy production to a
>centralized grid gives the typical electric car an equivalent efficiency of
>easily 100 mpg (likely much more than that).

Got a source for that 100 mpg?  I don't think it's true.

Mark Kapner from Austin Energy has done a number of studies on this.  Even in a 100% coal mix, the gains are positive with the exception of SOx (which I admit is a serious problem if it cannot be scrubbed or controlled otherwise).

Pesentation to Electric Auto Association chapters
meeting, April, 2005. Assumptions: Driving 12,500 miles/year, and EV charges using
kW per hour:

Note ICE = internal combustion engine on an average sized car, EV = electric vehicle

A) If electricity solely from coal:
CO2: ICE = 11,450 pounds/MWh; EV = 7,000 pounds/MWh (39% less).
NOx: ICE = 38 pounds/MWh; EV = 8 pounds/MWh (79% less).
HCs: ICE = 77 pounds/MWh; EV = 0.13 pounds/MWh (99% less).
CO: ICE = 575 pounds/MWh; EV = 1 pounds/MWh (99% less).
SOx: (EPA didn't list SOx for ICE);EV = 25 pounds/MWh.

B) If charge on mix from Calif. South Coast Air Basin (mostly natural gas):
CO2: ICE = 11,450 pounds/MWh; EV = 3,965 pounds/MWh (65% less).
NOx: ICE = 6 pounds/MWh; EV = 4 pounds/MWh (33% less).
HCs: ICE = 3 pounds/MWh; EV = 0.08 pounds/MWh (97% less).
CO: ICE = 192 pounds/MWh; EV = 0.4 pounds/MWh (99% less).
Sox: ICE = 1.2 pound/MWh; EV = 2.5 pounds/MWh (108% increase).

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html