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We would like to call your attention to two sessions planned for the Fall07
AGU Meeting (December 10-14) on Soil Carbon Stabilization and Responses to
Climate Change. Please post or forward this to any other interested parties,
and apologies for multiple receipts. Abstract submissions are due September
6th at http://submissions3.agu.org/submission/entrance.asp

BG14: Soil Carbon: Mechanisms of Stabilization
Soil organic matter contains more reactive organic carbon than any other
single terrestrial pool. Consequently, SOM balance (the difference between
accumulation of decaying plant materials and combined losses due to SOM
oxidation to CO2 and leaching or volatilization of dissolved compounds)
plays a major role in determining C storage in ecosystems and in regulating
atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Despite the critical roles played by SOM
within ecosystems, in the global C cycle, and in the Earth’s climate system,
controls on SOM balances in ecosystems remain poorly understood. In the
latest Investigators Meeting of the North American Carbon Program, soil
carbon storage and dynamics was pointed out as one of the key areas of
uncertainty in the carbon balance of North America. This session will focus
on studies of soils and carbon: storage potential, mechanisms of
stabilization/destabilization/long term storage. Invited talks will fall
into two categories: those that address mechanisms and process, and those
that use modeling approaches to understand response of C storage to climate
change and employ techniques to quantify change accurately at meaningful
scales for a landscape, a regional and/or the globe.
Co-conveners:
Kate Lajtha ([log in to unmask], Oregon State University),
Nancy Cavallaro ([log in to unmask], USDA-CSREES)

To be held in conjunction with:

GC11: Soil Carbon: Response to Climate Change
This session will present the mechanisms of soil carbon stabilization and
their responses to climate change. Research on the mechanisms controlling
the response of soil and litter decomposition to changes in temperature has
progressed significantly in recent years because changes in temperature
could have a dramatic impact on decomposition and on detrital and soil
carbon stocks. Diverse research approaches have led to advances in
understanding biological, chemical, and physical controls on decomposition
responses to temperature and in integrating those responses into modeling
efforts. This special session will serve as a forum to distill fundamental
principles and identify opportunities to resolve apparent conflicts in
experimental studies. We invite presentations of process- and
mechanism-level studies of soil and litter carbon dynamics under changing
temperature and of studies integrating that new understanding into models.
Co-conveners:
Alain Plante ([log in to unmask], University of Pennsylvania), Richard
Conant ([log in to unmask], Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory),
Serita Frey ([log in to unmask], University of New Hampshire)