Sam,
 
Good practical advice. Good to hear your voice.  Welcome to the conversation.
 
 
 
Lucie
 

On Jan 30, 2008 8:42 AM, Sam Hooker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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Adam Provost wrote:

| Some say it's important that we make decisions to prevent students from
| using technology or to pull back from this tide.  There's no question that
| this onslaught of information is getting larger. It seems like it's more
| important to teach people when to pull back, to learn to set
boundaries for
| themselves and to focus on making smart decisions on and around
| productivity. Adam

Agreed: there's not going to be much meaningful "turning back the tide",
at least not in the short run (when it would make a difference to the
people reading this today). We can, though, individually make conscious
decisions about our own boundaries: it's not like that's not MY cell
phone ringing, over there. I can choose not to answer it. (So long as I
can convince my clients to call the office first instead of my cell
phone...Tom.)

It's hard to consciously "do less" though, when you're constantly aware
of how much there is, well, "to do". To be truly successful requires
management (or administration) support. For instance: we've given our
benighted Project Manager (who also plays Triage Nurse) permission to do
exactly what Bill said: batch things up, so that she can get into an
"email groove", then a "voicemail groove". We're hoping that this leads
to less fragmentation on her part. (Because she's been running a screen
for our engineers, preventing us from being interrupted, and it's worked
beautifully.)

Having been a high school Technology Coordinator, I know how easy it is
to have your attention split in a million different directions. The best
thing I can suggest is a frank talk with your immediate
supervisor/administrator about helping set expectations for the Tech
Department's response time. (Call it your SLA, if you want.) It can be
very liberating to have someone of authority backing you up when you
make a conscious decision to "drop (or delay) some packets" in favor of
honest-to-goodness productivity.

Something confuses me, though:

| ...research firm focusing on the knowledge economy, interruptions from
| e-mail, cell phones, instant messaging, text messaging, and blogs eat
| up nearly 30...

Interrupted by a blog? I dare you: interrupt me with your blog. ;-)


Cheers,

- -sth

+-------
~  Sam Hooker [log in to unmask]              |
~  Consulting Engineer, Partner                 |
~  ClearBearing, Inc. (802)846-1855             |
~  Internet engineering | network services      |
~  http://www.clearbearing.com                  |
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--
Lucie deLaBruere
www.LearningWithLucie.com
www.InfiniteThinking.org

http://twitter.com/techsavvygirl


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