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I had a student many years ago who never spoke in class, but sent me an
email almost every day.

The Japanese must have a different system of billing for cellular
services.

Steve Barner, South Burlington 

-----Original Message-----
From: School Information Technology Discussion
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Dave Tisdell
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 8:44 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Cellphone obsession leads Japanese children to 'scary
world'

Sounds like some young people are moving in the direction of the
characters from Solaria which Isaac Asimov created in his robot novels;
they avoided human contact at all costs. Scary isn't it?

David Tisdell. Music Teacher
Browns River Middle School
20 River Road
Jericho, VT 05465
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>>> Steve Cavrak <[log in to unmask]> 1/11/2008 8:16 AM >>>
Cellphone obsession leads Japanese children to 'scary world'
By Miwa Suzuki
Agence France-Presse
First Posted 11:51am (Mla time) 01/11/2008
http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/infotech/view_article.php? 
article_id=111697

TOKYO--Young Japanese people are evolving a new lifestyle for the 21st
century based on the cellphones that few are now able to live without.

While about one-third of Japanese primary school students aged 7-12
years old use cellphones, by the time they get to high school that
figure has shot up to 96 percent, according to a government survey
released last month.

They are using their phones to read books, listen to music, chat with
friends and surf the Internet -- an average of 124 minutes a day for
high school girls and 92 minutes for boys.

While the wired world they now inhabit holds enormous advantages for
learning and communicating, it also brings a downside, say experts who
point to a rise in cyberbullying and a growing inability among teenagers
to deal with other people face to face.

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