Print

Print


Sam wrote:
>
ps. allen - i re-broke my rib today in a hard fall onto rocks, i
>think i'm going to take tomorrow off, but if i'm feeling ok by
>tonight, i might consider some bolton BC or a teardrop tomorrow.


CLASSIC!



>-----Original Message-----
>From: Sam Lozier [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2008 02:27 PM
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] Skier Dies in Wolverine Cirque
>
>you are dumb and reckless and have a death wish.
>
>
>kidding, i actually totally agree. i think its cynical to think that
>the circumstances of death aren't important, even if only for those
>that survive the deceased. I'd personally way rather go out doing
>what i loved, especially if it was quick, than slowly fading away in
>a hospital somewhere. I've also been asked to write a living will and
>had been putting it off because its an uncomfortable subject, but all
>these recent deaths have gotten me thinking about how important it
>is. Skiing is never about dying, its about (for me anyways) doing
>something that challenges and tests me in an environment that i love,
>it makes me feel alive. My grandfather passed over the summer of a
>huge heart attack, but he had hung on for over a month after the
>attack getting depressed and essentially waiting to die. i dont think
>anyone should have to go that way.
>
>sam
>
>ps. allen - i re-broke my rib today in a hard fall onto rocks, i
>think i'm going to take tomorrow off, but if i'm feeling ok by
>tonight, i might consider some bolton BC or a teardrop tomorrow.
>On Jan 23, 2008, at 1:54 PM, Allen Taylor wrote:
>
>> Fun Fun, lets all rip on the young guy because he thinks he is
>> invincible and thinks that a skiing death is glorious.
>>
>> Seriously though as cliche as it may be he did die doing what he
>> loved. I'm not saying in any way that he wanted to die, or intended
>> for it to happen. The fact of the matter is that he is dead which is a
>> horrible fact. Now on the other hand he died in a situation he put
>> himself in in the mountains I'm sure he loved. He was not hit by a
>> bus, didn't die of an overdose, or wasn't murdered. If you want to
>> talk about tragedy look at the numbers of people who die each year
>> from alcohol poisoning and overdoses alone. Those people die not in
>> the pursuit of happiness but instead under the influence of a drug or
>> their peers. Billy has nobody to blame for his death, there will
>> hopefully be no lawsuits and no settlements. He made a choice to live
>> life to its fullest and it finally caught up with him where he made a
>> poor decision, got unlucky, or both. I'm sure he understood fully the
>> danger he was putting himself in unlike all of the unlucky people who
>> die every year from unfortunate accidents on groomed trails.
>>
>> Most skiers (or any athletes in general) who push it don't do it out
>> of any death wish, or even in the hope of recognition, it is a way of
>> life and those who have never experienced it will never understand it.
>>
>> In response to Leigh's question I think that a more broad question is
>> more appropriate.
>>
>> If had a choice between seeking adventure and hapiness in the
>> outdoors for the next 8 years in any way possible (where I am now
>> skiing, and climbing present the best opportunity for this, but there
>> are many other sports and pursuits where this is possible).
>>
>> versus
>>
>> Spending the next 68 years imprisoned in a city away from the natural
>> world at a computer in a cubicle waiting for stress and heart disease
>> to catch up with me as I slave towards the perceived success of
>> material wealth. Where the most exciting thing that happens to me is
>> watching Sunday night football and drinking away my stress.
>>
>> I'll take the 8 years
>>
>> Most of you who don't know me and my friends that well probably assume
>> I'm young and dumb, overconfident, reckless etc. etc. I do think
>> however that the people who know me and my friends understand why we
>> do stuff and understand that we're not just overconfident,
>> "testosterone fueled", young idiots, with an immature death wish.
>>
>> My friends and I spend a good amount of time thinking and talking
>> about this kind of stuff. I even wrote a living will not that long ago
>> which was a very deep experience of reflection for me. We have all had
>> close calls and experiences, they just don't go away, they stay with
>> you and can bear influence on the rest of your career.
>>
>> Skiers like billy aren't skiing to die, they are skiing to live.
>>
>> Allen
>>
>> --
>> As lonely as the mountain can be, lonelier still is the man whose
>> travels take him away from the mountains.
>>
>> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>> SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.
>>
>> To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html
>
>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.
>
>To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html
>

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html