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       	An interesting article about a very remarkable historical puzzle.
        	Incidentally, the name Anasazi was applied to those Pueblo 
structures by some local Amerindians, at the end of the 18th century.
    	Charles Babbage published the idea of tree-ring dating in 
1837, but the first practical application of it (independently of 
Babbage, in about 1912) was the dating of the Anasazi structures.
	The author sensibly comments "Imagine trying to explain the 
19th-century Mormon migration to Utah with only tree rings and pollen 
counts".

	Jared Diamond gives an interesting study of Anasazi society 
in his book "Collapse".  He points out that the dense and wealthy 
population of the Pueblos was fed from farms widely scattered outside 
the canyons, and an enormous number of tree trunks were dragged (by 
men) over immense distances to build the Pueblo structures.  In that 
arid environment, such a highly stratified social structure was 
obviously fragile, and it is hardly surprising that a prolonged and 
severe drought coincided with the abrupt collapse of the entire 
society.  Diamond gives some vivid details of the evidence of the 
ruling class being eaten in their own homes.
	The author remarks "Curiously, as was true throughout the 
region, the victors didn't stay to occupy the conquered lands".  But 
how could they?  People living in the canyons depended on food grown 
at widely scattered farms outside, and some elaborate social 
structure was required for that food to be supplied to the ruling 
class living in the canyons.