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On Fri, 10 Oct 2008 11:40:57 -0400, Evan O <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On Fri, Oct 10, 2008 at 11:28 AM, Just.In Woods 
<[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> On Fri, 10 Oct 2008 11:16:22 -0400, Mike Bernstein
>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> >Every resort on the
>> >Green Mtn spine from K-Mart to Jay gets more snow than Keystone, yet I'll
>> >bet the average snowpack in the trees at Keystone is much deeper than
>> >here.
>>
>> so doesn't the second statement undermine the first?  it sure as shootin'
>> is
>> colder here than keystone (on avg)
>
>
>I think the better indicator is dewpoint. Keystone maintains a low dewpoint
>virtually all the time (along with the rest of the continental ranges of
>North America). We need one big dehumidifier in Vermont and we'll have a
>snowpack that lasts into summer, with the only potential problem being that
>we may inadvertently attract M1 back here.

Dewpoint is one factor, but I think the more important factor is that Keystone 
and its 8000' base elevation don't receive thaws featuring 40/50 degree temps 
and an inch of niar once a month or more.  It may be colder on avg here than 
Keystone, but the variability here is so much greater, that any benefit of 
being -10 for a while from a snow preservation perspective is quickly wiped out 
by a day or two of 42 degrees featuring fog and niar.  The latter just doesn't 
happen at Keystone unless they are in the midst of an historic Pineapple 
Express.  VT gets it at least once per month on avg.  

If there were a Mansifeld stake at the top of Keystone, the curve would show 
a pretty consistent increase in depth with flat spots (dry periods) and minor 
downward turns due to sublimation.  The typical curve on Manny, as I'm sure 
you've seen, fluctuates wildly in most years, with big snows followed by big 
thaws.  

Anyway, back to the point, consistent cold is a good thing.  It's goof for snow 
retention and it's good for snow creation b/c if you've got a strong NW flow to 
deliver cold, that usually means upslope and lake effect along the spine.
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