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Hi Maeve,
I was once told that if they breed in the "wild" they can be counted as a 
species i.e. on the breeding bird surveys run by the government.
Bonnie Dundas

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Maeve Kim" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, November 07, 2008 6:42 AM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cooper's hawk, bobwhites


> Hi, everyone.
>
> I have a good-sized fenced pen attached to my house, covered with  chicken 
> wire. I put it in so my cats could be outside without eating  birds or 
> getting hit by cars. When my last cat died a month ago, I  hung some 
> feeders inside the pen, protecting the seed from marauding  nighttime 
> raccoons and deer and providing birds a place to eat that  was safe from 
> the neighbor's feline.
>
> Yesterday, I stopped by my house in the middle of a work day. I was  home 
> only a few minutes when there was a racket outdoors: the sound  of many 
> mourning doves exploding into flight, blue jays screaming,  and lots of 
> metallic rattling. I ran to a window. About ten feet from  my face, and 
> completely oblivious to me, was an enormous Cooper's  hawk. She (it had to 
> be a female; it was huge!) was hopping around on  the top of the pen, 
> focusing on a dove who was crouched motionless  inside. After about two 
> minutes, the hawk flew a few feet to a tree  branch. The unfortunate dove 
> decided it was safe, walked out of the  pen, took to the air and went 
> about fifteen feet before being hit,  knocked to the ground and then 
> carried off.
>
> Also - there are a few bobwhite quail in South Hero that apparently 
> escaped from a game farm between one and two years ago and are still 
> around. One landowner thinks a pair might have nested this summer. At 
> what point do they go from being escapees to natives?
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center