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That is a fallacious statement of my argument, which is:

Topic A is important.
Study B provides useful insights into Topic A, because it identifies
cultural sources of illusions about relationships.
Therefore, Study B is important or at least interesting.

MB

On Tue, Dec 16, 2008 at 12:58 PM, Phil Gasper <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Actually, I think I will use this one in my critical thinking class next
> semester as an exercise for the students to point out its weaknesses.
>
> The following is a fallacious argument:
>
> Topic A is important.
> Study B is about A.
> Therefore, study B is important.
>
> --PG
>
>
> On Tue, Dec 16, 2008 at 11:51 AM, Michael Balter <[log in to unmask]
> > wrote:
>
>> Actually, I think this kind of study is important, and I think if Phil
>> thought about it a little bit more he might agree. Unrealistic expectations
>> about love and marriage are indeed a key factor in relationships breaking
>> up, as most people who have voyaged very far into adulthood know anecdotally
>> and which psychologists, family therapists and professionals know from their
>> practices and research. Since troubled relationships are a key cause of
>> suffering in the world, understanding more about them makes sense to me.
>>
>> As I have said before, let's not be the John McCains and Sarah Palins of
>> the left when it comes to critiquing science.
>>
>> MB
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Dec 16, 2008 at 12:43 PM, Phil Gasper <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>>
>>>  http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/edinburgh_and
>>> _east/7784366.stm
>>>  Published: 2008/12/16 10:02:45 GMT
>>>
>>> *Rom-coms 'spoil your love life'*
>>>
>>> Watching romantic comedies can spoil your love life, a study by a
>>> university in Edinburgh has claimed.
>>>
>>> Rom-coms have been blamed by relationship experts at Heriot Watt
>>> University for promoting unrealistic expectations when it comes to love.
>>>
>>> They found fans of films such as Runaway Bride and Notting Hill often
>>> fail to communicate with their partner.
>>>
>>> Many held the view if someone is meant to be with you, then they should
>>> know what you want without you telling them.
>>>
>>> Psychologists at the family and personal relationships laboratory at the
>>> university studied 40 top box office hits between 1995 and 2005, and
>>> identified common themes which they believed were unrealistic.
>>>
>>> The movies included You've Got Mail, Maid In Manhattan, The Wedding
>>> Planner and While You Were Sleeping.
>>>
>>> The university's Dr Bjarne Holmes said: "Marriage counsellors often see
>>> couples who believe that sex should always be perfect, and if someone is
>>> meant to be with you then they will know what you want without you needing
>>> to communicate it.
>>>
>>> "We now have some emerging evidence that suggests popular media play a
>>> role in perpetuating these ideas in people's minds.
>>>
>>> "The problem is that while most of us know that the idea of a perfect
>>> relationship is unrealistic, some of us are still more influenced by media
>>> portrayals than we realise."
>>>
>>> As part of the project, 100 student volunteers were asked to watch the
>>> 2001 romantic comedy Serendipity, while a further 100 watched a David Lynch
>>> drama.
>>>
>>> Predestined love
>>>
>>> Students watching the romantic film were later found to be more likely to
>>> believe in fate and destiny. A further study found that fans of romantic
>>> comedies had a stronger belief in predestined love.
>>>
>>> Kimberly Johnson, who also worked on the study, said: "Films do capture
>>> the excitement of new relationships but they also wrongly suggest that trust
>>> and committed love exist from the moment people meet, whereas these are
>>> qualities that normally take years to develop."
>>>
>>> The researchers have now launched an online study on media and
>>> relationships.
>>>  They are asking people to participate by answering questions about
>>> personality, relationships, and media consumption habits by filling in a
>>> questionnaire which you can click on here<http://remark.sls.hw.ac.uk/cgi-bin/rws3.pl?FORM=Media_study>
>>> .
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> ******************************************
>> Michael Balter
>> Contributing Correspondent, Science
>> Adjunct Professor of Journalism,
>> Boston University
>>
>> Email:           [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Website:       michaelbalter.com
>> Balter's Blog: michael-balter.blogspot.com
>> ******************************************
>>
>
>


-- 
******************************************
Michael Balter
Contributing Correspondent, Science
Adjunct Professor of Journalism,
Boston University

Email:           [log in to unmask]

Website:       michaelbalter.com
Balter's Blog: michael-balter.blogspot.com
******************************************