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Compassion, maybe, salutes, no, because she was influential with her
anti-science views and therefore endangered the lives of many, many
people--and she killed her daughter.

MB

On Wed, Dec 31, 2008 at 3:52 PM, Mitchel Cohen
<[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> Not a moment of compassion for this woman, who lived by her principles and
> fought as hard as she could for a truth that remains beyond comprehension of
> many here?
>
> Well, I for one salute Christine Maggiore, who fought the pharmaceutical
> industry with her own body, was forced to make excruciatingly hard choices
> and didn't shy from them, and helped raise the consciousness of many, many
> people -- and saved many, many lives.
>
> Thank you, Christine Maggiore, for your courage and your love of life. Rest
> in Peace.
>
>
> Love,
> Mitchel
>
> -----Original Message-----
> >From: Eric Entemann <[log in to unmask]>
> >Sent: Dec 30, 2008 7:55 AM
> >To: [log in to unmask]
> >Subject: Re: Christine Maggiore, vocal skeptic of AIDS research, dies at
> 52
> >
> >
> >Seems that there is a strong parallel to Christian Science nonsense.
> >
> >Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2008 12:38:15 +0100
> >From: [log in to unmask]
> >Subject: Christine Maggiore, vocal skeptic of AIDS research, dies at 52
> >To: [log in to unmask]
> >
> >Her AIDS denialism killed her daughter, and now probably herself.
> >
> >MB
> >
> >
> http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-christine-maggiore30-2008dec30,0,7407966.story
> >
> >
> >Christine Maggiore, vocal skeptic of AIDS research, dies at 52
> >
> >
> >       Woman and her husband sued Los Angeles County for finding that
> daughter died of AIDS-related pneumonia.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >       By Anna Gorman  and Alexandra Zavis
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >         December 30, 2008
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >Until the end, Christine Maggiore remained defiant.
> >
> >On
> >national television and in a blistering book, she denounced research
> >showing that HIV causes AIDS. She refused to take medications to treat
> >her own virus. She gave birth to two children and breast-fed them,
> >denying any risk to their health. And when her 3-year-old child, Eliza
> >Jane, died of what the coroner determined to be AIDS-related pneumonia,
> >she protested the findings and sued the county.
> >
> >On Saturday, Maggiore died at her Van Nuys home, leaving a husband, a son
> and many unanswered questions. She was 52.
> >
> >According
> >to officials at the Los Angeles County coroner's office, she had been
> >treated for pneumonia in the last six months. Because she had recently
> >been under a doctor's care, no autopsy will be performed unless
> >requested by the family, they said. Her husband, Robin Scovill, could
> >not be reached for comment.
> >
> >Jay Gordon, a pediatrician whom the
> >family consulted when Eliza Jane was sick, said Monday that Maggiore's
> >death was an "unmitigated tragedy."
> >
> >"In the event that she
> >died of AIDS-related complications, there are medications to prevent
> >this," said Gordon, who disagrees with Maggiore's views and believes
> >HIV causes AIDS. "There are medications that enable people who are
> >HIV-positive to lead healthy, normal, long lives."
> >
> >Diagnosed
> >with HIV in 1992, Maggiore plunged into AIDS volunteer work -- at AIDS
> >Project Los Angeles, L.A. Shanti and Women at Risk. Her background
> >commanded attention. A well-spoken, middle-class woman, she was soon
> >being asked to speak about the risks of HIV at local schools and health
> >fairs. "At the time," Maggiore told The Times in 2005, "I felt like I
> >was doing a good thing."
> >
> >All that changed in 1994, she said,
> >when she spoke to UC Berkeley biology professor Peter Duesberg, whose
> >well-publicized views on AIDS -- including assertions that its symptoms
> >can be caused by recreational drug use and malnutrition -- place him
> >well outside the scientific mainstream.
> >
> >Intrigued, Maggiore
> >began scouring the literature about the underlying science of HIV. She
> >came to believe that flu shots, pregnancy and common viral infections
> >could lead to a positive test result. She later detailed those claims
> >in her book, "What if Everything You Thought You Knew About AIDS Was
> >Wrong?"
> >
> >Maggiore started Alive & Well AIDS Alternatives, a
> >nonprofit that challenges "common assumptions" about AIDS. She also had
> >a regular podcast about the topic.
> >
> >Her supporters expressed
> >shock Monday over her death but were highly skeptical that it was
> >caused by AIDS. And they said it would not stop them from questioning
> >mainstream thinking.
> >
> >"Why did she remain basically healthy from
> >1992 until just before her death?" asked David Crowe, who served with
> >Maggiore for a number of years on the board of the nonprofit Rethinking
> >AIDS. "I think it's certain that people who promote the establishment
> >view of AIDS will declare that she died of AIDS and will attempt to use
> >this to bring people back in line. But you can only learn so much from
> >an unfortunate death."
> >
> > Brian Carter, who facilitated local peer groups with Maggiore, said the
> movement would remain strong.
> >
> >
> >"Christine was only part of this. There is an outstanding number of
> >prominent rethinkers, independent thinkers, doctors, scientists,
> >lawyers who question AIDS causation."
> >
> >Though they run counter to
> >the scientific consensus about AIDS, such beliefs can have a major
> >effect. In South Africa, where about 5.7 million people live with HIV,
> >the government refused until 2005 to fund antiretroviral treatment,
> >citing questions about the effectiveness of the drugs that inhibit the
> >replication of HIV.
> >
> >Federal health officials and other experts
> >say the link between HIV and AIDS has been shown in hundreds of studies
> >and the prescription of antiretroviral drugs has helped reduce the
> >pandemic to a chronic but manageable disease in the United States.
> >Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health calculated earlier
> >this year that the South African government's delay in introducing
> >treatment between 2000 and 2005 cost more than 330,000 lives in that
> >country.
> >
> >Craig Thompson, executive director of AIDS Project Los
> >Angeles, said Maggiore was an effective and powerful advocate, in part
> >because she was a woman living with HIV. But he said her message
> >discouraging testing and treatment was dangerous.
> >
> >"It's just
> >really sad that she never could understand and never could trust the
> >medical community, unlike the rest of the world," Thompson said.
> >
> >Maggiore's friends said she underwent a holistic "cleanse" last month that
> left her feeling ill.
> >
> >"She
> >was telling me that she wasn't feeling great," Carter said, adding that
> >he questioned whether the pneumonia was related to AIDS.
> >
> >As an
> >advocate, Maggiore counseled HIV-positive pregnant women on how to
> >avoid pressure to use the drug AZT as a method to reduce the chances of
> >transmission to their babies. She considered the drug toxic.
> >
> >Maggoire
> >gave birth to her son, Charlie, and his younger sister, Eliza Jane, at
> >home and breast-fed both, although research indicates that it increases
> >the risk of transmission. Eliza Jane Scovill died in 2005 from what the
> >coroner ruled was AIDS-related pneumonia. Maggiore and Scovill,
> >however, hired a pathologist who concluded that the girl died of an
> >allergic reaction to the antibiotic amoxicillin.
> >
> >After Eliza
> >Jane's death, Los Angeles police investigated whether Maggiore and
> >Scovill were negligent in not testing the girl for HIV. In 2006, the
> >Los Angeles County district attorney's office decided not to file
> >criminal charges against Maggiore, saying that it would have been
> >difficult to prove criminal negligence because Maggiore had sought
> >medical advice. Friends said that Maggiore never fully recovered after
> >the death of her daughter and that she had trouble even sleeping and
> >eating. Her preteen son, Charlie, has tested HIV negative.
> >
> >Last
> >year, Maggiore and Scovill sued Los Angeles County and others on behalf
> >of their daughter's estate, charging that the autopsy report lacked
> >proper medical and scientific evidence for the declared cause of death.
> >The case is pending.
> >
> >[log in to unmask]
> >
> >[log in to unmask]
> >--
> >******************************************
> >
> >Michael Balter
> >Contributing Correspondent, Science
> >Adjunct Professor of Journalism,
> >Boston University
> >
> >Email:           [log in to unmask]
> >
> >Website:       michaelbalter.com
> >
> >Balter's Blog: michael-balter.blogspot.com
> >******************************************
> >
> >_________________________________________________________________
> >Life on your PC is safer, easier, and more enjoyable with Windows Vista(R).
> >http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/127032870/direct/01/
>



-- 
******************************************
Michael Balter
Contributing Correspondent, Science
Adjunct Professor of Journalism,
Boston University

Email:           [log in to unmask]

Website:       michaelbalter.com
Balter's Blog: michael-balter.blogspot.com
******************************************