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I've had one pair at my feeders and in my yard each summer for  
several years. This year, there are two males and a female every day.  
I've been waiting for the extra male to head somewhere else, but it's  
been two weeks now. Could he be the young from a previous year? Do  
members of this species help out with nesting and raising young, like  
ospreys?

There was a third male who met a tragic end. I found him inside a  
feeder that's covered with wide mesh, dead, with a good-sized  
puncture wound. My best guess is that the local Cooper's Hawk hit him  
just as he was nearing the feeder and then couldn't get him out. That  
must have been very frustrating for the hawk!

Over the last week, there's been a male Indigo Bunting at the feeder,  
a White-Crowned Sparrow scratching around underneath, two or more  
Chestnut-Sided Warblers in the tree where they nested last year, a  
Phoebe nesting in the barn, and a House Wren scolding whenever I get  
too near one of the "bluebird" boxes (which have always been used by  
wrens or swallows). The Ruby-Throated Hummingbird has taken up his  
favorite look-out spot in a dead branch, from which he swoops down to  
chase any other hummers.


Maeve Kim
Jericho Center