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Thanks for clarifying, Pam.  I guess that for the average user, avoiding
the whole ad mess by going with PBworks just seems easier.  But you are
absolutely right!  The blog software, when managed, is great.  I suppose
it might be what you are used to.  I switched to wikis when the ad issue
hit some of my teachers and have been really happy with it.  It seems to
encourage collaboration more than does a blog.  Either way, getting
classrooms to collaborate is a shared goal,, while protecting student
identities.  Has anyone had success with ePals?  I'm starting to push on
that source and hope I find some good matches.

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Lauren Kelley Parren
ANESU Educational Technology Coordinator
Mt. Abraham Portfolio Coordinator
802-453-2333 x 1119



School Information Technology Discussion <[log in to unmask]> on
Wednesday, August 05, 2009 at 9:03 PM -0500 wrote:
>I don't know why I always feel compelled to clarify this, but it's just
>me I guess. I'll echo Lauren's frustration with hosting services like
>Edublogs that embed adds in their free blogs, I hate it! However, it is
>the hosting service, not the Wordpress software that is the problem.
>Wordpress is open-source blog software that anyone can install on their
>server and it has NO ads. It's the host that's the problem. You can host
>your own blog & avoid the problem, or pay the host to dump the ads for
>you. 
>
>
>The software is great, but the free hosts can be a drag.
>
>Pamela Burke
>Librarian, Marlboro School
>Marlboro, VT 05344
>[ http://marlboroschool.net ]http://marlboroschool.net
>
>
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>
>
> 
>
>On Aug 5, 2009, at 7:29 PM, Lauren Parren wrote:
>
>
>
>
>I have given up on blogs.  PBworks meets all of my needs.  We did upgrade
>to a campus license because we have 140 10th grader contributing all
>sorts of stuff, and I wanted the ability to keep some pages private and
>some pages public.  I really like the flexibility of PBworks and have
>multiple accounts for multiple audiences.  I ran into problems with
>wordpress with popup ads embedded in the text that the author couldn't
>see, but participants could.  On the word Arab, a chat room popped up for
>a sort of dating service. That totally freaked me out, and their
>suggestion was just to pay for the very reasonable school account.  The
>price was, in fact, reasonable, but the fact that they didn't warn us
>about the ads made me ditch them completely.  I can't recall the name of
>the other blog that is the educational version of wordpress, but it was
>the same problem.  If any of your teachers wants to contact me, by all
>means, feel free.  I'll be working on 3 or 4 wikis tomorrow.
>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Lauren Kelley Parren
>ANESU Educational Technology Coordinator
>Mt. Abraham Portfolio Coordinator
>802-453-2333 x 1119
>
>
>
>School Information Technology Discussion <[ mailto:[log in to unmask]
>][log in to unmask]> on Wednesday, August 05, 2009 at 3:00 PM -0500
>wrote:
>Help!  I have 3 teachers who would like to create blogs that students can
>participate in, but don't want to deal with student e-mail, even the fake
>ones. Preferable would be a way to enter student usernames and passwords
>if necessary.  
>
>Blogmeister would have worked, but rumor is that David Warlick is not
>maintaining it.  Edublogs won't let us do what we want without
>subscribing/paying. A lot of other more "private" sites are now requiring
>payment.
>
>Any suggestions for either a wiki site or blog site that would allow a
>teacher to input the names of students who are allowed to comment/post,
>not have to have any type of e-mail addresses (not even fake - we tried
>the gmail thing with linked e-mail), and still allow some type of parent
>access/viewing would be really helpful.  This is for grades K - 4.
>
>Thanks!
>
>Joanne
>
>
>Joanne Finnegan
>Technology Integration Specialist
>Chittenden East Supervisory Union
>(voice) (802) 858-1728
>(fax) (802) 899-1059
>This e-mail may contain information protected under the Family
>Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).  If this e-mail contains
>student information and you are not entitled to access such information
>under FERPA, please notify the sender.  Federal regulations require that
>you destroy this e-mail without reviewing it and you may not forward it
>to anyone.
>
>
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>