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Way too heavy for this warm spell.  Baseball would be a lot lighter subject.  :-)    jimski

--- On Mon, 8/17/09, Patrick Haskell <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: Patrick Haskell <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [SKIVT-L] Prominence of Mountains
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Monday, August 17, 2009, 2:07 PM
> Actually, it's the
> elevation difference between a peak and the low point
> between it and the next higher peak.  By definition,
> therefore, Everest is the most prominent, as there is no
> higher peak.  The prominence of Mt. Washington is
> measured against the nearest peak of higher elevation, which
> is in the Black Mountains of NC (looking this up - Celo
> Knob)..  The prominence of Mt. Washington (~6,100 feet)
> is the distance from the lowest contour that fully encircles
> Mt. Washington without encompassing some other higher
> peak.  Kind of strange to be measuring the prominence
> of Mt. Washington from the Champlain valley, but that's
> how it works.  Kind of odd to be calling, for example,
> Mt. Cardigan more prominent than Mt. Adams, since Mt. Adams
> is part of the Presidentials and is
>  shorter than Mt. Washington.  Like Denis said, the
> real measure of a mountain is skiable vertical.  
>


      

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