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I'll add some comments:

I "3rd" the edgie wedgie recommendation - it's the only tool we used with our daughter (no harness, no pole, etc).   My guess is it's between 3 and 5". 

We hired an instructor for a couple hours to teach us how teach our daughter.  I recommend that to everyone who asks.  I also understand it's not feasible for you right now.  Just keep it in mind if you find you aren't making progress, getting frustrated etc.

2.5 is young.  Too young for some kids.  I know nothing of your child - just be prepared for the possibility that you won't make as much progress as your base note lays out.  And you might make a lot more progress.

And whatever you do, do not lose sight of the fun aspect.  It's got to be about fun, not skiing.

Good luck.  I'm jealous, I'd give just about anything to be back at that age.

Brad

PS - sorry no equipment left from that era.  Swaps have tons of it.

---- Matthew Kulas <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> On Sun, Sep 13, 2009 at 12:49 PM, roger Klinger <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >
> > Justin and TEO agreed:
> >>the edgie-wedgie -- odious as the term is -- is also key
> >
> > How long should I make it?  3", 6" 12"?
> 
> 
> Short.  You could always go to Ski Express and measure what they sell.
>  Toddlers don't have the leg strength to hold a wedge, but with the
> Edgie Wedgie, all they have to do is push their feet out and they will
> automatically form a wedge.  The EW is essentially a joint between the
> ski tips.
> 
> 
> > On Sun, Sep 13, 2009 at 12:26 PM, Matthew Kulas <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>
> >> Start with a professional teacher.
> >
> > I know but:
> >
> >> At $145 for four lessons (parent & child), it's a pretty affordable
> >> opportunity.
> >
> > you don't understand what I mean by "not financially feasible" this year.
> > Plus, I do agree with JW that at this young age its almost exclusively about
> > fun and play, and that happens best with a parent.  In future years,
> > assuming better finances,  I definitely plan on having her enrolled in
> > weekly lessons.
> 
> 
> Check out the program description.  Ski Tots is a program where the
> instructor works with the parent & child on how the parent can
> effectively teach his/her child how to ski.  It's a program that
> teaches you how to have fun and play more effectively (and safely).
> It's not weekly lessons.  And, at an average cost of about $36, per
> session, including lift tickets, is it really unaffordable (rhetorical
> question)?
> 
> 
> >> Teach your child how to fall on command.  B.A. has some great tips on
> >> how to do this.
> >
> > Interesting idea.  Care to share a tip or 2?
> 
> 
> 1) B.A. is great at describing a good technique so that the child will
> fall on the hip that you want her to.  She teaches you how to use your
> child's imagination to overcome her lack of understanding of more
> sophisticated concepts.
> 
> 2) Take Ski Tots.
> 
> 
> >> Use the surface lifts (i.e. handle-tows), not the magic carpet--you
> >> spend 100% of your time developing your skiing skills as opposed to
> >> 50%.
> >
> > I agree in theory.  But at this age, I imagine I'd be holding her, as she
> > has no strength to hold on to a tow for long.  Am I wrong about this?   If
> > I'm holding her,  I don't imagine that her skills are developing.  Correct
> > me if 'm wrong.  Regardless, she will be seeing both Cochran's and Smuggs.
> 
> 
> Yes, you're wrong.  I don't know what Sonya's upper body strength is
> like, she may or may not be able to hold on to the tow, but
> regardless, she will ski up between your legs.  (You don't hold her.)
> Her skis are moving on the ground and she has to control them, so
> she's automatically developing her skills.  On a magic carpet, all
> kids do is stand still for a couple of minutes.  Not much learning
> there.
> 
> 
> > Can I assume that boots at this level are ultra-comfy, and I don't need to
> > drag Sonya to the swap to make sure the boots don't cause her agony, the
> > same way that all boots do for me?
> 
> 
> Yes, they're probably ultra comfy, but that doesn't mean you couldn't
> get a boot that made her miserable or was a gross misfit.  You live
> within minutes of the Sale, so you *really* should bring her.
> 
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