Print

Print


On Mon, Sep 14, 2009 at 12:53 PM, Denis Bogan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Modern wind turbines generate ~ 1 Megawatt of power.  That is a big number.
> After applying the 'capacity factor' (the fraction of max. that you can hope
> to get 365 24/7) of ~ 35% that is still 350 Kilowatts.  I have no feel for
> these things but that is still a big number.

Actually modern wind turbines typicall generate 1.5, 2.0 or 3.0 MW of
power (rated capacity). The turbine being installed at Bolton is a
Northwind 100, which is small by modern standards (100 kW).

Assuming a 30% capacity factor, the turbine will generate 30 kW on
average (thus 30 kWh per hour, 720 kWh per day, or 262,800 kWh per
year). A typical New England household uses ~7200 kWh annually, so
doing the math the turbine will generate enough to power 36 typical
households over the course of a year.

If BV expects the turbine to provide 1/8 of its energy needs, it is
presumably using the energy of close to 300 normal households on an
annualized basis (obviously much more demand in winter and much less
in summer).

Evan

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
SkiVt-L is brought to you by the University of Vermont.

To unsubscribe, visit http://list.uvm.edu/archives/skivt-l.html