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Not that I have any experience with it, but it seems a good time to 
again remind people that M$ has a free antivirus product now.  I'll 
leave it to someone else to give a review of the software.

http://www.microsoft.com/Security_Essentials/

EB

Dean Williams wrote:
> It was financially feasible, because of vendor license terms, to 
> license Symantec Antivirus for home computers, but that's not the case 
> with NOD32; there are a fixed number of licenses.  We have not made 
> that sufficiently clear.  
>
> Software made available on the software download site is generally 
> licensed for use on University-owned computers.  Student-owned 
> computers are included when it's software students need for academic 
> purposes, or, as in the NOD32 case, for the protection of the 
> networked community, and when it's financially affordable.   (UVM's 
> NERCOMP membership has helped us purchase NOD32 for students at a 
> lower per-computer cost than for University-owned computers.)  When 
> vendor licensing terms make it financially and logistically feasible, 
> software can be licensed so that no one has to contribute a 
> per-computer amount towards the license costs; in other cases, UVM is 
> able to negotiate a volume license but people using the software 
> contribute to the license cost.    Some software is licensed per seat, 
> and some per FTE or headcount -- available terms vary, and what how 
> broadly software can be made available is most often a function of 
> cost (Microsoft Campus Agreement is another example in which a true 
> "site" license is cost prohibitive).  
>
> The good news for faculty and staff personally owned computers is that 
> AVG has a decent virus protection product that's free (on personally 
> owned computers, not on institutionally owned computers).  It has a 
> good reputation, and provides an upgrade path to their non-free 
> advanced products.  
>
> Does anyone have other protection products to recommend for faculty 
> and staff personally owned computers?  Good or bad experience with AVG 
> Free?  
>
> I've been sidestepping the question about a computer purchased with a 
> mix of University and personal funds.  Who actually owns it?  
>
> The issue of using personally owned computers for any University 
> business is a hot topic, for sure, and there is a bit of a policy 
> vacuum in that area right now.  Development of that policy will have 
> to balance costs, practicality, and some inescapable requirements 
> related to security and legal compliance.  
>
> -Dean 
>
> On Nov 11, 2009, at 3:28 PM, Bryan Fleming wrote:
>
>> Good clarification, thanks Dean and Andrew.   Is that true also of 
>> other licensed software such as endnote, ArcGIS and others? I'm 
>> looking at the specific of a personal machine for work use, and not 
>> using endnote to catalog your DVDs. ;)  A gray area for sure though.
>>
>> So just a few thoughts worth considering..  
>>
>> 1)With the VPN we can't access local networks while connected, this 
>> is to protect campus resources from whatever nastiness is present on 
>> your local network.  (since many machines will route by default) But 
>> the computer that is connecting may have all sorts of nastiness on it 
>> which through the VPN can get access to the campus.  
>>
>> 2)I know some staff/faculty members that bring their personal laptop 
>> on campus to do work. (again with the result of nastiness getting 
>> access to campus)
>>
>> 3)For planning for and in the event of a pandemic people are/would be 
>> specifically asked to be doing work on their personal machines.
>>
>> There is of course then the concern of sensitive data being used on 
>> compromised systems.  An expensive and damaging potential problem.
>>
>> I'm not saying that antivirus is any sort of panacea, but it's one 
>> more part of the puzzle.  Granted with Microsoft's protection now 
>> being free this may be less of a point than previously, but many 
>> users aren't aware of it as a solution.
>> >From a security standpoint it looks to me like providing some sort 
>> of solution to staff & faculty might well be in UVM's best interest.  
>> And in fact may be far less expensive than privacy breach remediation 
>> and litigation.
>>
>> It seems like we should set some sort of policy with it published 
>> very very clearly (probably a link right on the the download for the 
>> VPN would be a good idea) for personal machines used for work (and 
>> there may be one, but the link on the vpn download still strikes me 
>> as a good idea), be it that it has to use protection we provide (if 
>> we were to update our license) or to use one of some suggested 
>> products ideally including at least one free solution.  Perhaps 
>> adding them at least as links to the software download site for 
>> personal machines.   Of course that may leave us needing to support 
>> those programs as well.
>>
>> This could be as simple (and inexpensive) as adding a link to the 
>> software download site to Microsoft security essentials for personal 
>> machines, linking a policy off the VPN download and planning to 
>> support security essentials.  But for liability and prevention 
>> reasons it would seem like a good thing to make as explicit as possible.
>>
>> -Bryan
>
> On Nov 11, 2009, at 2:52 PM, Helen Read wrote:
>
>> At 02:27 PM 11/11/2009, Dean Williams wrote:
>>> The software download site 
>>> <https://www.uvm.edu/software/magicscript.php?platform=Windows> now 
>>> carries this clarification of the NOD32 license:
>>>
>>>     Licensed for UVM students on personally-owned computers and for
>>>     faculty/staff on UVM-owned computers only.
>>>
>>
>> This is news to me. I thought all along that NOD32, and Norton 
>> Anti-virus before it, were licensed for home use for all UVM 
>> affiliates. Isn't the idea to make it as easy as possible for the UVM 
>> community to keep their computers virus-free, so as not to infect the 
>> campus network?
>>
>> If the license really does not include faculty/staff personally owned 
>> computers, I think we should upgrade the license so that it does.
>>
>> Many/most of us use personally owned computers to do UVM work from 
>> home, and there is also a gray area with, say, my laptop that was 
>> paid for partly by my department and partly by me. Is that UVM owned, 
>> or personally owned?
>>
>>
>> Helen Read
>> Senior Lecturer
>> Department of Mathematics & Statistics
>> University of Vermont
>>
>