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Does anyone have any mesenteric diagnostic criteria SPECIFIC To post  
PTAS?  Thanks

D

Doug Marcum
RDMS,RDCS,RVT(APS)
*Advanced Ultrasound Consultants
*Global Vein Solutions
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On Jan 15, 2010, at 12:03 PM, Ann Marie Kupinski  
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> You are right in that any bilateral pulsatility is an indicator of a  
> more central problem such as CHF, tricuspid insufficiency, pulmonary  
> hypertension.
>
> Unilateral pulsatility is not seen with a pseudoaneurysm.  However  
> other causes include:
> Iatrogenic AV fistulae (like those seen with insitu bypasses)
> Congenital AV fistulae
> Traumatic AV fistulae
> Of course if there is a dialysis graft or fistula in the limb
> Also anything that will increase the arterial inflow to a limb will  
> increase the venous outflow.  What goes in must come out.  Some time  
> you can see increased venous flow which is slightly more pulsatile  
> in a limb with infection or trauma (both of which will increase flow  
> into the limb).
>
> From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of  
> Cyndi Lufkin
> Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2010 4:14 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Venous Pulsatility
>
> Pulsatility from a cardiac origin would be bilateral in "normal"  
> limbs.
> CHF and Pulm HTN  are two primary reasons veins would be pulsatile.
> Other cardiac pathologies could affect venous hemodynamics as well  
> but these would be the most general ie: CHF or pulm htn secondary to  
> severe valvular pathology.
>
> If it is unilateral then there may be several explanations:  Ask  
> yourself a few questions when and if that is noted:
> 1. Has the pt had any recent interventional procedures?
> 2. Has AV Fistula been ruled out?
> 3. Has Pseudoaneurysm ruled out?
>
> 4. Is there proximal obstruction or extrinsic compression in the  
> contralateral limb that is preventing the veins on that side from  
> otherwise appearing pulsatile?
>
> flownetters: what can you add?
>
>
> From: Barb B. Lemon <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Wed, January 13, 2010 12:32:55 PM
> Subject: Venous Pulsatility
>
> Does anyone have a reference that explains how one can find  
> pulsatility in one lower extremity (CFV and GSV) and not the other?  
> Is it clinically significant if found in only one limb of a  
> bilateral exam?  Thanks for the brain power!
>
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