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Just thought I would put this out there. I am doing a Red Day at my clinic 
On Feb 5th. I usually do free screenings at the Institute on the Sat after.
There is more info probably thru your local American Heart Chapter.
Here's a fact sheet I put together to hand out that day:

FEBRUARY 5,2009 WEAR RED FOR WOMEN AWARENESS

CDC SUPPORTS NATIONAL WEAR RED FOR WOMEN DAY
WHY?                          

Just a few facts to ponder:
                 42% if WOMEN who have heart attacks die within a year
                           Compared to 24% MEN
               Under the age of 50, women's heart attacks are twice as likely as men's 
                            to be FATAL.
                Nearly 2/3 of the deaths from heart attacks in women occur among 
                            those who have no history of chest pain.
                 Women who smoke risk having a heart attack 19 years earlier than
                             that of non-smokers.
                  23% of White,38% of Black,36% of  Mexican American women
                             are OBESE. 
                  Obesity leads to an increased risk of premature death due to 
                             cardiovascular problems like hypertension,stroke and
                             coronary artery disease.
                   Marital stress worsens the prognosis in women with heart disease.

COMPARED TO MEN:
                Men's plaque distributes in clumps whereas, women's distributes evenly 
throughout artery walls. This results in women's angiographic studies being misinterpreted as "normal".
                 Women wait longer to go to an emergency room when having a heart 
attack and physicians are slower to recognize the presence of heart attacks in women
because "characteristic" patterns and EKG changes are less frequently present. 
                   Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease.
And the gap between men and women's survival continues to widen. 
                    Women's hearts respond better to healthy lifestyle changes. 
                     Women comprise of only 24% of participants in all heart-related studies. 

RISK FACTORS:

High Cholesterol
High Blood Pressure
Diabetes
Smoking
Overweight/Obesity
Poor Diet
Physical Inactivity
Alcohol/Drug Use

              www.womensheart.org    www.sdheartwalk.org    www.cdc.gov/wisewoman
 

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