They sound like Larus argentatus. Were you in the United States of America? They are abundant in North America. See:
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Herring_Gull/id


On Mon, Jan 11, 2010 at 8:01 AM, telenaut <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Rounded the top of a hill and a flock of small, mostly white birds took off, if thatís what you call hugging the airís bottom, hardly leaving two feet between their tails and dried grass. Their bodies and their wingtips were white. Their wing shoulders were winter sea grey blue.
At first it seemed an ordinary bird flock. They took off in a slow wave, flew 30 yards, low, to what mustíve struck them as safer ground, then landed.
Except they kept coming. Before the first, flock-like 30 birds had done their flying and landing, it slowly and steadily became obvious that there was a huge number more of these birds, coming from what appeared, just over the curve of the hill from where I stood, to be one tiny spot. Took several minutes (5?) for the whole collection of them to move. The only way I could †explain to myself what I was seeing was to call it the evacuation of an underground, or undersnow, communal nest of these white and grey air jackrabbits. ††

Anyone recognize the description?

--tn

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