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I don't suggest the book(s) because I agree with everything in it,
rather because it helps us to look at some complex issues and how we
are part of the problem and how we might be able to lessen the
problem.  In fact, in WILDERNESS ETHICS, the authors often don't offer
answers.

While Guy did create a significant recovery task with his
suicide--which I do not in any way condone--he hardly left his corpse
to rot in a fragile alpine environment.

--Matt K.

On Wed, Jan 20, 2010 at 10:18 AM, Marc Chrusch <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> At 08:05 AM 1/20/2010, Matthew Kulas wrote:
>>
>> Like I said, Tag et alia, read WILDERNESS ETHICS by Laura & Guy
>> Waterman.  Then tell me that it is a bunch of BS.
>
> That may not be the best example to use. When I read Backwoods Ethics, my
> initial reaction was that while there were some really good points and ideas
> to follow, it was basically constructed on a framework of altruistic crunchy
> granola BS. I find it ironic that when Guy decided to exit, he chucked all
> his beloved ethics to the wind and left his corpse to rot in a fragile
> alpine environment and brought about a not insignificant recovery task.
>
> Edward Abbey may well be much closer to what you're actually saying.
>
> -marc
>
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