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Hi Ian and Carl,

Thanks for sharing your observations.  I guess it's not so unusual for the
two species to travel together.  Some of the birds I saw were flying down to
a wet spot, where the foundation drain from my house drains into the woods
edge.  So maybe they're both attracted to the same water sources.

--Ken

On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 8:01 PM, Ian Worley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hi Carl and Ken,
>
> Here on the southern end of Snake Mountain we have had a large flock of
> Cedar Waxwings (over 100 at times, other times in small groups of 15-25) and
> an even larger flock of Robins (over 140 typically, lesser groups in the
> 40-50 range ... presumably a sub group of the flock) since early December.
>  Almost always, regardless of which species dominates, there are Robins and
> Waxwings intermingled.  During really cold weather they are usually found
> together at small seeps.  So far as I can tell, all the Waxwings are Cedar
> Waxwings.  There is a strong color difference between the male and female
> Robins.
>
> If I don't see them around the house I can usually find them within a
> couple of miles of home.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Ian
> ===================
>
> Carl Runge wrote:
>
>> These two species appeared simultaneously in my yard last week, their
>> first appearance of the year.  In fact the robin was harassing (playing
>> with?) the waxwings.
>>
>> Carl
>> Williiston, VT
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: Kenneth Copenhaver <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Sent: Tue, March 9, 2010 4:21:58 PM
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Robins and Waxwings
>>
>>
>> I saw an oddly-mixed flock of about 15 Robins and 8 Cedar Waxwings at my
>> home today.  (At least it seems odd to me.)
>>
>> Ken Copenhaver
>> Fairfax VT
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>