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Old snow cover below a temperature inversion with temp's not too far away
from 32 = lots of fog! In fact if you ever notice low clouds on the lower
slopes post-snowfall, it's usually near 32 F isotherm - one of the visual
little tricks you can use to read the conditions 

 

Roger 

Weathering Heights...

 

From: Vermont Skiing Discussion and Snow Reports
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Denis Bogan
Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2010 4:18 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [SKIVT-L] What's with the Fog?

 

The entire western half of the continent has experienced much fog recently.
It makes me wonder what is going on.  In 2+ weeks of skiing UT about half
the days were foggy.  Often this was accompanied by light snow.  One such
day at Powder Mtn. my partner fell from vertigo within 50 ft. of the lift,
got up and immediately fell again from vertigo.  The other 2 of us had skied
away by then and didn't find him until lunch time.  I am now in Chicago
visiting my son enroute home.  Driving here, fog in the evening driving into
Laramie.  Next morning pea soup fog on the east slope of the Laramie Range
and less severe fog all day across Nebraska.  Yesterday fog all across Iowa
and Illinois enroute to Chicago.  Last night in Chicago 100 ft. visibility
in pea soup and the same this morning, followed by an hr. or so with a
strange yellow orb in the sky but now fog & haze closing in again.   What is
going on?  The Olympics were foggy on the slopes most of the time, which is
not unusual so close to the Pacific, but in the desert of the intermountain
west and on the plains???

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