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Skip,

Thank you. I can't wait to try it. (I agree, mixing foie gras with cilantro
would be like asking a French person to fight in Vietnam.)

BTW, if any of you are cooking anything that requires the use of bacon (in
my case today, boeuf bourguignon), I cannot recommend enough the triple
smoked bacon from Karl's Sausage Kitchen. Mmmmmmmmm. Bacon.

caveat lector


On Fri, May 7, 2010 at 7:48 PM, Skip King <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> On 5/7/2010 7:27 PM, Marc Chrusch wrote:
>
>> At 05:21 PM 5/7/2010, Nathan Bryant wrote:
>>
>>> Lamb burgers should include cilantro
>>>
>>
>> Have to be careful with cilantro. There is a certain percentage of the
>> population (I forget the quantity) that tastes an strong soap note when they
>> eat it, rendering the food inedible.
>>
>>
> Exactly what my late Dad said about it.
>
> Meantime, I would find the taste of cilantro mixed with truffle-studded
> foie gras a nonstarter.
>
> Okay, so what does Skip like to grill?  One of my favorites makes no sense,
> in that the ingredients come from completely opposite environments, but this
> is truly delicious - salmon grilled with chile colorado.
>
> For the chile colorado, stem and seed a 2 oz package of dried New Mexico
> chiles (6 to 8), tear them into chunks and put them in a bowl.  Cover them
> with boiling water.  Soak for a half an hour.  Then grind them in a food
> mill (if you don't have one, puree them in a food processor and pass them
> through a fine seive, mashing them through.  You want to get rid of seeds
> and skin.  Use the soaking liquid while you're doing this.  You'll end up
> with between one and two cups of pulp that looks rather like
> slightly-thinned Heinz 57 sauce.
>
> Sautee a few cloves of garlic, finely minced, in about a tablespoon of
> vegetable oil until translucent. Add tablespoon of dried oregano or
> marjoram, and a teaspoon or two of ground cumin (or to taste).  Stir and
> reduce the heat, and add the chile pulp.  Cook over low heat for about 15
> minutes, stirring constantly; salt to taste.  Remove from heat and cool.
>
> Next, take some salmon - you can use steaks (cut across the fish) or
> filets.  I prefer the filets. If using filets, make sure you pull the pin
> bones.  Paint the fish liberally with the chile colorado (you'll have some
> left over and that's a Very Good Thing).
>
> Get your grill - real charcoal, please, not briquets, not gas - going;
> limit the fire to one side of the grill.  Toss a few water-soaked wood chips
> - mesquite is nice - on the coals.  Make sure the grate is nice and clean.
>  Get the grate good and hot and lube the grill with veggie oil applied with
> a kitchen towl (use tongs for this).  Place the salmon, skin side down, on
> the hot part of the grill, then spin the grill so that you're finishing over
> indirect heat.  Lid that suckah.  Cook until MR in the middle, which will
> vary somewhat depending on the thickness of the salmon.
>
> It's good, campers.  Better than any burger.
>
> Parveh, too!
>
>
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