Print

Print


> From: "Jean Iron" <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: July 23, 2010 5:39:13 PM EDT
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: [Ontbirds] James Bay Shorebirds, Ontario #2
> 
> This is Jean Iron's second report on 23 July 2010 by satellite phone for
> the period 18-22 July from Longridge Point on the south coast of James
> Bay. The Royal Ontario Museum study of Red Knots and shorebirds is a
> cooperative effort with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources
> (OMNR), Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and Trent University.
> 
> SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS
> The past several days have been mainly sunny with daytime high
> temperatures below average with cool nights. High tides have been weak
> so shorebirds were less concentrated for counting. Usually only high
> count day numbers for each species are listed below in checklist order.
> 
> Black-bellied Plover: 2 adults on 20-21 July.
> 
> Semipalmated Plover: 26 probable adults in flight on 22 July.
> 
> Killdeer: 10 on 21 July. Late nest with 4 eggs hatched on 22 July.
> 
> Greater Yellowlegs: 137 mostly adults on 19 July.
> 
> Lesser Yellowlegs: 480 (1/3 juveniles) on 18 July.
> 
> Whimbrel: 78 adults on 20 July.
> 
> Hudsonian Godwit: 222 molting adults on 19 July. Adult Hudsonian Godwits
> molt body feathers before migrating from James Bay usually going nonstop
> to South America in late August and early September.
> 
> Marbled Godwit: None seen. 
> 
> Ruddy Turnstone: 102 on 22 July appeared to be mostly females in worn
> alternate plumage. 
> 
> RED KNOT: Highest count to date of 638 molting adults on 20 July is half
> the number for same period in 2009. 69 flagged individuals observed
> include birds banded in the United States, Brazil, Argentina and Chile.
> The above include 7 birds marked before 2005. One with a data logger
> from Delaware Bay (USA) observed on 20-21 July. After breeding in the
> Canadian Arctic, rufa Red Knots migrate to stopover areas such as
> southern James Bay, where they fatten for the long flight to South
> America. Another rufa population winters in Florida. Florida knots are
> rare in James Bay. Longridge was chosen as the ROM's survey site because
> high numbers were recorded there in the past. A one-day estimate of 5000
> at Longridge was made in the late 1970s before the decline.
> 
> Sanderling: 22 fading and molting adults on 18 July.
> 
> Semipalmated Sandpiper: 1095 adults (no juveniles) on 22 July. 
> 
> Least Sandpiper: first juvenile on 17 July. 80 (1/2 juveniles) on 20
> July.
> 
> White-rumped Sandpiper: 109 molting adults on 22 July.
> 
> Pectoral Sandpiper: 540 adults (not molting) on 20 July.
> 
> Dunlin: 11 worn adults not yet in active molt on 22 July.
> 
> Stilt Sandpiper: 2 molting adults on 21-22 July.
> 
> Short-billed Dowitcher: 6 adults (not molting) on 19 July comprised 2
> nominate subspecies griseus and 4 hendersoni. 8 on 21 July were mostly
> hendersoni. 1 nominate griseus on 22 July. 
> 
> Wilson's Snipe: 4 still winnowing on 19 July.
> 
> WILSON'S PHALAROPE: One juvenile on 21 July found by Mark Peck and Lisa
> Pollock. It likely hatched locally because this phalarope breeds
> sparingly in the prairie-like marshes of James Bay.
> 
> OTHER SIGHTINGS
> Birds: American White Pelican seen daily with high of 57 on 20 July.
> Sandhill Crane. Yellow Rail numbers are much lower than last summer
> possibly linked to drier marshes this year. Some Yellow Rails may have
> short-stopped to breed in the areas such as southern Manitoba, which is
> very wet this summer with many reports of singing Yellow Rails.
> Short-eared Owl, pair with two young. Gray Jay, pair with a blackish
> juvenile. Swainson's Thrush singing. Orange-crowned Warbler singing. Le
> Conte's Sparrow nest with eggs on 22 July. Nelson's Sparrow nest with
> eggs on 19 July. Small numbers of White-winged Crossbills and Common
> Redpolls seen most days.
> 
> Mammals: A dead Beluga, 3 metres in length, washed up on shore. Crew
> hopes the carcass will attract scavengers such as Red Fox, Gray Wolf and
> Lynx whose tracks have been seen during surveys. Two Black Bears seen on
> 19 July. A Caribou on 19 July. A Short-tailed Weasel (Mustela erminea)
> is around camp. 
> 
> Butterflies: Two additions since last report: Skipper sp. (genus
> Polites) and Northern Crescent.
> 
> Map link below of southern James Bay. Yellow pointer shows location of
> Longridge Point. Ontario borders the west coast of James Bay and Quebec
> borders the east coast. Provincial boundaries extend to the low water
> mark on James Bay. Offshore islands extending to the low water mark are
> part of Nunavut Territory. The waters and seabed of James Bay are
> internal parts of Canada under exclusive federal jurisdiction and not
> part of Ontario, Quebec or Nunavut.
> www.jeaniron.ca/2009/James-Bay-2009-REKN.jpg
> 
> Jean will call again in 4-6 days and I'll post her third report.
> 
> Ron Pittaway
> Minden, Ontario
> 
> _______________________________________________
> ONTBIRDS is presented by the Ontario Field Ornithologists - the provincial birding organization.
> Send bird reports to ONTBIRDS mailing list [log in to unmask]
> For information about ONTBIRDS visit http://www.ofo.ca/
> 
> 

Eve Ticknor
Coordinator OFNC Falcon Watch
38-9 Gillespie Cres
Ottawa, Ontario  K1V 9T5
613-859-9545,  613-737-7551

Box 122, 35 Elm St
Essex, NY  12936

"All nature is but art, unknown to thee"