No, DO NOT invert.  The careful interpreting physician will recognize that the reversed flow implies a proximal occlusion in that vessel and will include this in his/her interpretation.  If you invert, you make it less likely that this will be noticed.

 

Joseph R. Schneider, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.C.S., R.V.T.

Vascular and Interventional Program of Central DuPage Hospital

Outpatient Services Building Suite 201

25 North Winfield Road

Winfield, IL 60190

Voice: 630-933-4487

Fax: 630-933-2009

Professor of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School

 

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From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Smith, Matthew G.
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 7:34 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: ABII question

 

It doesn’t matter, the pressure doesn’t care, hit invert if you don’t like it.

 

 Matt

 


From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Michael Savage
Sent: Sunday, February 06, 2011 17:42
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: ABII question

 

When taking pressure for the PT or DP and considering that they are anastomosed through the planter arch if you get a negative pulse do you use that or wait until you get a positive pulse to measure the pressure?

 

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