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Any info on this table..where to purchase, how much, and will insurers approve this model for "standing"?

On Mon, Feb 7, 2011 at 11:54 PM, Joan P Baker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

We used this list serve as well as other methods to get input from over 50 vascular technologists. We also looked into some insurance carriers and their rules and we attended the Am College of Phlebotomy Conference and will be attending another similar vein conference in a couple of weeks in San Diego. We did this because reflux studies was listed as the most injury producing study of ALL procedures performed using ultrasound for diagnosis..  This was a relatively new procedure and coupled with an increase in incidence of WRMSD especially in vascular technology we felt this warranted special attention and consideration. A specific table was designed that  would permit full weight bearing using a 70 degree reverse Trendelenburg which when a patient stands on this is essentially standing upright. The table has a split footboard to accommodate none weight bearing and is designed so that if the patient gets dizzy or unstable it is easy to get them head -down and legs supported. The vascular technologist no longer has to sit on the floor or risk asking the patient to stand on a stool the  bed goes up so that the calf is level with the sonographers arm in a normal seated position on a chair, able to reach the control panel without over reaching. The patient has rails to hold onto as well as a strap to go across their waist.

 

(There is a panus sling if needed but this can be difficult to use when the patient is standing, it is more commonly used to reach the vessels in the groin area when the patient is lying down). The weight capacity of the table for lift and load is 600 lbs. the table goes to a height from  23 inches to -39.5 inches electronically

 

All these features were the wish list of the profession and the interpretation of what insurers and accrediting bodies stated they must have. Driven also by WRMSD and alarming numbers of injured health professionals all over the world.

 

So I get confused when I read quote If you are having to purchase new equipment then you are doing too much. I don’t see what you need other that a low stool for you to sit on and a low stool for them to step up on(preferably with a handle). That should just about do it. If you want to do them sitting have them swing their legs over the side of the bed.”

 

Is this why so many are injured? Many do not have a height adjustable table to work with, many are sitting on the floor to scan, if you are on a low stool or on the floor  how do you reach the control panel without abducting your non-scanning arm?  How do you avoid twisting your neck? How do you avoid raising your chin to see the monitor? ICAVL requires knowledge of ergonomics as well as procedural protocols they should be commended for this but the field needs to know how to comply with both.

 

 

From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Schneider, Joseph R.
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 11:44 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Venous Reflux and ICAVL requirements

 

Many insurers (including BC/BS Illinois) now refuse to consider approving treatment unless it is explicitly stated that the exam is performed in the standing position

 

 

From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Benge, Claudia
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 12:32 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Venous Reflux and ICAVL requirements

 

Susan,

We use a 40 degree reverse trendelenburg position.  We have 15 degree tilting beds with hydraulic head mechanisms.  So we put two pillows for comfort behind their head and then raise the head of the bed.  We have measured the angle and we get between 40 and 45 degrees by this maneuver.  Then if we have trouble with recording reflux, our protocol calls for standing the patient and re checking the superficial veins that do not demonstrate either good flow or reflux.  If no reflux found standing…then they do not have reflux.  We have inexpensive steno chairs that allow us to sit low or higher. 

Watch out for patients that are more symptomatic at the end of their work day.  We bring these type of patients in late in our scanning days so we can duplicate more of their symptoms. Also we ask them to drink water for about two hours prior so they will have better fluid hydration and increase in their flow hemodynamics. 

Claudia

 

 

From: UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Case, Susan
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 12:46 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Venous Reflux and ICAVL requirements

 

I am trying to find our how people are doing venous reflux exams these days. The ICAVL mandates that patients must be sitting or standing to perform the studies. Does anyone have any suggestions that do not necessitate purchasing new equipment?

 

Susan Case RDMS/RVT

Noninvasive Vascular Lab

Summa Health System

 

 

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