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Thanks for clarifying your thinking Greg.  This kind of thing is way  
outside anything I would do, I get nervous sometimes skiing trees 3 or  
4 miles in.

I also wouldn't expect either of you to fall, but sometimes gear does  
break.

I'm looking forward to the next tour.

Mike

On Feb 8, 2011, at 12:11 PM, Greg Petrics wrote:

> I'll put it this way.
>
> If the rope or anchor snapped in a freak accident, we were dead, and  
> a rescue would have been a Popsicle retrieval. So we weren't really  
> considering that since that sort of worry if pondered too long will  
> keep anyone on the couch. With the number of climbers and other  
> backcountry travelers who access the surrounding terrain regularly,  
> we weren't putting ourselves in harms way by assuming this risk any  
> more than numerous other users.
>
> For some other non life threatening "who-knows-how" injury, it  
> wouldn't been too tough to manage with a party of two as is usually  
> done by say, an ice climbing party of two. An anchor could have been  
> built nearly anywhere given our gear, and the person loaded (albeit  
> painfully), on rappel, and then fireman lowered by the other party  
> member until they were down to an elevation that was nontechnical.  
> At that point the noninjured could either phone in a sled to haul  
> off the injured, or gone to a point where a land line was  
> accessible, and given location details. This is in line with most  
> opinions of what is a responsible level of preparation for self  
> rescue.
>
> On Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 11:55 AM, Michael Taub  
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> I was thinking about this and wondering about doing this with just 2  
> people.  I've always thought three was a good number in case someone  
> gets hurt.  However, the more I thought about it, if someone got  
> hurt in there, 2 or 3 people wouldn't make that much difference. The  
> rescue would be tough.
>
> Or did you figure you could use the Burton method and call for help  
> with the cell phone?
>
> Mike
>
>
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