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I did note this point at the time, Robert, sorry I failed
to acknowledge it then.  The fact that energy differences in the
range of microwave radiation have roles in DNA replication
is surely relevant to the question of whether microwaves
can cause mistranscription or other biological damage.  My
question is relevant too: Shouldn't we ask about the effects
of absorption of frequencies n times that of the radiation
incoming.  (Significant surely only if the incoming radiation
is quite high-amplitude and n isn't terribly huge.)  I gather
you agree.
 			Chandler



On Wed, 1 Jun 2011, Robert Mann wrote:

> 	I've been wondering about this puzzle: I sent my brief note (part 
> re-quoted again below) to this list 3 y ago but it evidently didn't "sink 
> in".
> 	The world-famous head of the Auckland cancer research lab is a 
> contemporary & friend of mine.  He remarks on the widespread fallacy that an 
> effect is overlooked or disbelieved if no mechanism has been proposed. 
> Although what he's known for is hard-core reductionist biochem (e.g  he 
> developed the anti-cancer drug m-AMSA), he also believes that 
> mind-over-matter treatment can help (as propounded by the Simonton couple in 
> their book).  He complains that when asked to discuss that notion, many 
> scientists say no mechanism has been proposed for mental processes to affect 
> cancers, and "therefore" it cannot occur.  I too am astounded, and dismayed, 
> at the frequency of this fallacy.
>
>>
>> 	The mechanism I've proposed for a couple decades is absorption of 
>> such a radio quantum during formation of a base-pair in a nucleic acid 
>> interaction e.g  transcription, translation or DNA replication.  Quanta 
>> within IR-microwave frequencies are well known to induce vibronic 
>> transitions in amino etc groups within nucleic acid bases.  Defective 
>> base-pairing could thus ensue, i.e a wrong base get inserted in the 
>> newly-forming DNA or RNA.
>
> 	Perhaps this notion itself did not sink in among those who lack my 
> (arduous, resented) education in molecular spectroscopy & QM. Let me expand.
> 	Small parts of large molecules such as DNA & RNA include such groups 
> as amino (-NH2), hydroxyl (-OH), etc.  Impressively detailed spectra, 
> generally in the frequency ranges IR or microwave, have been rather 
> thoroughly quantitatively interpreted in terms of changes in vibrations &/or 
> rotations of such groups.  An amino group, for instance, is envisaged as a 
> 'top' (as in the children's toys), spinning faster in a quantised fashion  - 
> most rpm are inaccessible, and jumps between the permitted values of the 
> top's rpm turn out to be in the microwave region.
> 	Now, the hydrogen atoms on certain amino groups in NAs are crucial in 
> the famous base-pairings A-T, C-G, A-U to specify which base hydrogen-bonds 
> to which on another NA strand.  Mispairing is a known phenomenon.
> 	My notion is that if the vibronic status of a given group involved in 
> base-pairing gets changed immediately before a base-pair is to form in e.g 
> transcription (synthesis of mRNA by base-pairing on 1 DNA strand), or DNA 
> replication, a wrong base may get inserted in the newly-formed strand.  Such 
> an error could (in a complex series of subsequent events) lead to cancer.
>
> 	I trust therefore that we can at last agree: cancer caused by 
> cellfone-type radiation could occur, and insofar as one is interested in 
> possible mechanisms, mispairing in NAs is a proposed notion.  I'd be 
> delighted to hear any scientific discussion of my notion, which of course may 
> turn out upon exploration to be infeasible; meanwhile, let's cease to say no 
> mechanism has been proposed.
>
> RM