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I've run across this too, and like Kitty, do not remember what school was involved. I had this happen in the late '90's into 2002, and attributed it to early start-ups. It may have been more about the students being clueless (as Kitty points out), but that doesn't change the fact that a librarian is trying to help a student access materials "out there in cyberspace", and it can impact our ability to serve our primary patrons.

Monica Corcoran, MLIS
Medical Librarian
Deaconess Hospital
600 Mary Street
Evansville, IN 47747
812-450-3385 
812-450-7255 (fax)

-----Original Message-----
From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Warner, Kathleen M
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:45 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: ILL and Ethics

Sorry I don't remember the name of the school.  The students who visited were clueless about resources -- so if they had a library they didn't know about it, or how to use one.  I like to help people, but I don't always have the time to start from square one.

And of course our first duty is to our own employees.

Kathleen M. (Kitty) Warner, MLS, M.Ed.
Manager, Health Sciences Library
Hennepin County Medical Center
701 Park Avenue
Minneapolis, MN  55415
(612) 873-2714


-----Original Message-----
From: Medical Libraries Discussion List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Catherine Arnott Smith
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2011 10:14 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: ILL and Ethics

On 7/28/2011 10:02 AM, shannon clever wrote:
> It may not be either.  You have to factor in convenience which may include location and/or access to the resources.  Many people are now doing distance learning. How many of us find it difficult as professionals to keep up with every change that happens in the various search interfaces.
>

Oh, yes, Shannon -- I agree -- there are obviously lots of reasons 
students might hit up their local public libraries, and convenience is a 
big one. I just wanted to point out that these public librarians 
themselves felt they faced a real ethical dilemma similar to the one 
Donna Beales is describing for her hospital library. Namely: Where's the 
best place for the patron to be asking for ILLs? The librarians I talked 
to really did believe that some of these people didn't know that they 
had library resources available to them as students. Simple 
finger-pointing was not going to educate those patrons; they needed a 
10-minute PowerPresentation on "Libraries 101: All The Different Kinds 
There Are and What They Can Do For You."

Kathleen Warner wrote "What really steams me are the for-profit colleges 
with NO library.  They expect their students to pay these exorbitant 
prices and then scrounge around for resources." I teach a lot of 
distance classes myself and took part in the accreditation process for 
the first distance program accredited in the state of New York (at 
Syracuse University). That was in the mid-2000s and the program itself 
had been around for almost a decade at that time. Library resources was 
a piece of the total institutional picture that the accrediting team 
looked at very, very carefully. At least in New York.  So I've been 
puzzled myself how the for-profits get away with the sort of behavior 
Kathleen Warner is describing.


-- 
Catherine Arnott Smith, PhD
Assistant Professor
School of Library and Information Studies
Room 4255 Helen C. White Hall
600 N. Park Street, Madison, WI 53706
Phone: (608) 890-1334
Fax: (608) 263-4849

My personal website: https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/casmith24/web/

***
The machine does not isolate us from the great problems of nature but plunges us more deeply into them.(Antoine de Saint-Exupery)

***
Music is neither old nor modern: it is either good or bad music, and the date at which it was written has no significance whatever. (Peter Warlock - The Sackbut - 1926)

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