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Childhood leukemia also correlates well with any electrical radiation density, like 
near transformers, near cell towers, etc.   So "nuclear power plant" is also a 
hazardous electrical radiation source, as large long-distance high voltage power 
lines emanate out through residential areas.  Not defending nuclear energy, but  
I am noting that nuke can confuse electrical hazards, as this article is doing.

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On Sat, 21 Jan 2012 11:07:39 -0500, Mitchel Cohen 
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>
>Info compiled by Tony Gronowicz:
>
>French study finds childhood leukemia doubled around nuclear plants
>http://www.beyondnuclear.org/home/2012/1/12/french-study-finds-
childhood-leukemia-doubled-around-nuclear.html
>
>A major epidemiological study just published in the January 2012 edition of
>The International Journal of Cancer
>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.27425/abstract
>indicates there is "a possible excess risk" of acute leukemia among
>children living in close vicinity to French nuclear power plants (NPP). The
>study called for an "investigation for potential risk factors related to
>the vicinity of NPP, and collaborative analysis of multisite studies
>conducted in various countries."
>
>The study found a doubling of occurrence of childhood leukemia between the
>years of 2002-2007 among children under 5 years living within 5 km of
>nuclear plants � similar to the findings of the German 2008
>study
>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2696975/?tool=pubmed
>by the Cancer Registry in Mainz which found an association between the
>nearness of residence to nuclear power plants and the risk of childhood
>leukemia.
>
>The results marked a surprising and encouraging 
>change at IRSN which had endeavored to discredit
>earlier French epidemiological studies that had 
>shown an impact of nuclear facilities on health.
>
>*****
>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.27425/abstract
>
>To study the risk of childhood acute leukemia (AL) around French nuclear
>power plants (NPPs).
>
>The nationwide Geocap case-control study included the 2,753 cases 
diagnosed
>in mainland France over 2002-2007 and 30,000 contemporaneous population
>controls. The last addresses were geocoded and located around the 19 NPPs.
>The study used distance to NPPs and a dose-based geographic zoning 
(DBGZ),
>based on the estimated dose to bone marrow related to NPP gaseous
>discharges.
>
>An odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 [1.0-3.3], based on 14 cases, was evidenced for
>children living within 5 km of NPPs, compared to those living 20 km or
>further away, and a very similar association was observed in the
>concomitant incidence study (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.9
>[1.0-3.2]). These results were similar for all the 5-year age groups. They
>persisted after stratification for several contextual characteristics of
>the municipalities of residence. Conversely, using the DBGZ resulted in OR
>and SIR close to one in all of the dose categories. There was no increase
>in AL incidence over 1990-2001 and over the entire 1990-2007 period. The
>results suggest a possible excess risk of AL in the close vicinity of
>French NPPs in 2002-2007. The absence of any association with the DBGZ 
may
>indicate that the association is not explained by NPP gaseous discharges.
>Overall, the findings call for investigation for potential risk factors
>related to the vicinity of NPP, and collaborative analysis of multisite
>studies conducted in various countries.
>
>Get PDF (531K) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.27425/pdf
>
>Childhood leukemia around French nuclear power plants -� the Geocap study,
>2002-2007�
>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.27425/absstract#fn1
>
>****
>
>
>
>
>http://www.MitchelCohen.com
>
>
>Ring the bells that still can ring,  Forget your perfect offering.
>There is a crack, a crack in everything, That's how the light gets in.
>~ Leonard Cohen
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