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Helen,

I found the following comment from Greg in an early-February email on
the subject:

"I was able to get the machine working again simply by booting using the
PGP Recovery ISO, removing the disk, then rebooting."

So, you may not need to decrypt the whole HDD.

Additionally: Any sense for when you reinstalled PGP? The first
"Lion-compliant" version of PGP WDE we pushed was 10.2.0 MP3, but it had
this effect on some Macs. The problem was addressed by 10.2.0 MP4.
(10.2.0 MP5 is currently available for download at
http://www.uvm.edu/software.)


Cheers,

-sth

--
Sam Hooker | [log in to unmask]
Systems Architecture and Administration
Enterprise Technology Services
The University of Vermont


On 20120427 15:09 , Sam Hooker wrote:
> 
> Helen,
> 
> You could try recovering using either the "EFI recovery disk" or "Target
> Disk Mode" methods, both of which are detailed here:
> 
> http://www.symantec.com/business/support/index?page=content&id=TECH149559
> 
> 
> (If you're planning to use Target Disk Mode, note the
> potentially-counterintuitive arrangement they recommend: booting the
> *healthy* machine in TDM, and then booting the afflicted Mac using that
> as an external boot volume.)
> 
> Please let us know how it goes.
> 
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> -sth
> 
> --
> Sam Hooker | [log in to unmask]
> Systems Architecture and Administration
> Enterprise Technology Services
> The University of Vermont
> 
> 
> On 20120427 14:42 , Helen Read wrote:
>> I have a PGP encrypted Macbook Pro (running Lion 10.7.1). I had
>> previously decrypted the disk and uninstalled PGP before upgrading from
>> Snow Leopard to Lion and then installing a newer Lion-compatible PGP
>> (replacing a version that would not have worked with Lion) and
>> re-encrypting the disk.
>>
>> I don't use this machine very much, and hadn't had it on in a while.
>> Today I turned it on and let it install a bunch of updates for the OS
>> and various software, e.g. Java. It downloaded the updates and chugged
>> through installing them, the progress bar got to 100%, and then there
>> were some messages about writing files etc. Then I got a white screen
>> with a spinning wheel, and in place of an Apple logo, there was (is) a
>> circle with a line through it (see attached picture). I left for class
>> and came back a couple of hours later to find it still in this
>> condition. I powered it off and back on, and the Apple logo came up
>> briefly, before reverting back to the international symbol for You Have
>> Bricked Your Machine above the still spinning wheel.
>>
>> Questions --
>>
>> 1. Is it completely toasted? (This is more of a rhetorical question.)
>>
>> 2. Now what? Take it to the Depot, from whence it came?
>>
>> 3. What caused this? Did I accept an update that I wasn't supposed to
>> and/or was I supposed to install a newer PGP first?
>>
>> 4. Fortunately this not my main computer, and does not have anything of
>> importance on it (I have it mostly for learning about Macs, and I
>> suppose bricking the thing is part of the learning process). But what is
>> a typical user of a PGP encrypted Mac supposed to do about updates?
>> Don't ever do them without checking with your IT support person first??
>>
>