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One of our Pt Satisfaction consultants is seeking research on how patients
perceive / react to / feel about caregivers and their cell phones, iPods,
etc.  The gist of it is that patients might feel ignored or unattended when
caregivers interrupt their care to take phone calls, or provide care while
plugged into an iPod, that kind of thing.  I can find a few things about
how the advent of EMRs creates a situation where doc/nurse is spending all
their time tapping into a computer and not looking at / engaging the
patient, but this isn't really what she's after.  I believe it's more about
coaching caregivers to not take phone calls, not wear headphones / earbuds,
etc. while engaging in patient care activities because patients don't like
it.  I'm drawing a blank except for the usual customer service etiquette
advice.  (Don't even ASK me about patient perceptions of nurse
uniforms...!)  I think this is really kind of common sense, but hope
springs eternal when it comes to "evidence-based management"!  Any bright
ideas gratefully accepted.  Thank you!

Is it Friday yet?

-- 
Julie Stielstra, MLS
Manager, Knowledge Resource Library
Central DuPage Hospital
25 N Winfield Rd
Winfield, IL 60190
phone 630-933-4536
fax     630-933-4530
email jstielstra [ at ]  gmail.com

"Never...be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those
three vices...and I can always be hopeful of you."  -- Betsy Trotwood to
David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)