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Yesterday, I asked a question about finding out the average H-Index for
authors in a given field or the average number of times an article in a
given field is cited. After posting this question, here, on Facebook and
Twitter, I found an answer that works well enough for me.

I went into Web of Science, did a keyword search for "statistic*" and then
limited it to the years when my author would have been publishing. I then
refined the search to include only articles and since it was under 10,000,
I ran the Citation Metrics on the results. That gave me some charts that
showed the number of articles that came came out each year during my time
period and then also gave me the number of times those articles were cited
for the last 5 years (if you expand the chart, you can see all years).  It
also gave me:

  Results found:

[image: Description:
http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS56B5/images/spacer.gif]

Sum of the Times Cited  :

Sum of Times Cited without self-citations :

[image: Description:
http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS56B5/images/spacer.gif]

Citing Articles :

Citing Articles without self-citations :

[image: Description:
http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS56B5/images/spacer.gif]

Average Citations per Item  :

[image: Description:
http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS56B5/images/spacer.gif]

h-index  :

I am going to send this to my patron and see if it satisfies his needs.

Someone did suggest to me that I could download the software "Publish or
Perish" which would also allow me to get results from Google Scholar to
analyze, but I did not pursue that avenue because, while it might give me
higher results for my author, I couldn't think of a good way to get results
for other people in his same field to compare those numbers to.

Thank you to all who suggested options. If anyone knows a better way to
find out the average H index for authors in a given field, please feel free
to let me know. I have a feeling this question will come up again.

Thanks!

Amy

Previous question follows.


Hello everyone,

So, Iím a bit stumped. Iím trying to find out how the number of citations
for this article:


*A SIMPLE METHOD OF ESTIMATING FIFTY PER CENT
ENDPOINTS*<http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/493.full.pdf>

aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/493.full.pdf

by LJ REED - 1938 - Cited by
11705<http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&cites=3452508576950532954&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&ei=jdLpT-OvB-eY2wXNlOjvCA&ved=0CFYQzgIwAQ>-
Related
articles<http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&lr=&q=related:WjsgMULG6S8J:scholar.google.com/&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&ei=jdLpT-OvB-eY2wXNlOjvCA&ved=0CFcQzwIwAQ>
3. *A SIMPLE METHOD OF ESTIMATING FIFTY PER CENT*. *ENDPOINTS* l '2. BY. L.
J. REED AND H. MUENCH. (Received for publication October 26th, 1937) *...*



Compares to similar articles in the field.  Or, how this author compares to
other authors in the field. Iím not sure itís possible. This article does
not show up in Web of Science. Probably because itís rather dated, but it
is still being cited. Itís that important.



I did use Researcher ID to create an H-Index for this person, but I donít
think itís very accurate. Afterall, it doesnít include this article, and so
itís likely missing other important articles by this researcher. I could
try to use Google Scholar Citations, but Iíd need to create a new account
(I donít want to redo my personal one) and even if I do that, Iím not sure
where I can go to find the average H index for a statistician or public
health researcher.



Do any of you have thoughts on this?



Thanks!

*Amy Blevins, MALS*

Clinical Education Librarian

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences

600 Newton Road

Iowa City, IA 52242
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Phone: 319-335-7636
Fax: 319-353-3752