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so i'm lead to believe,  most aortic anuerysms are eccentric rather than
truly saccular, or fusiform for that matter...
matt

On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 1:32 PM, Poe, Patricia (poepa)
<[log in to unmask]>wrote:

>  Just call me Robin…….at least for today.  Certainly, I am no Bruce
> Wayne!!  Working with Dr. Polak and the other faculty at IAME meetings
> gives me occasional Bat Phone privileges it seems.****
>
> ** **
>
> Tish Poe****
>
> ** **
>
> *From:* UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Steven
> Knight
> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 03, 2012 3:06 PM
>
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Eccentric Aortic Aneurysms****
>
>  ** **
>
> Thanks Patricia.****
>
> I set Jonathan Nguyen to the task of asking him (Dr. Polak). Clearly the
> Bat Phone to Commissioner Gordon is on your desk, not Jon’s.****
>
> ** **
>
> ~S****
>
> *From:* UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]<[log in to unmask]>]
> *On Behalf Of *Poe, Patricia (poepa)
> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 03, 2012 2:58 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Eccentric Aortic Aneurysms****
>
> ** **
>
> This is from Dr. Polak:****
>
> ** **
>
> This is to clearly distinguish saccular aneurysms from other types of
> aneurysms.****
>
>  ****
>
> Sonographers may be tempted to call an aneurysm saccular if the aorta is
> dilated in an "eccentric fashion" (not evenly) and when the term fusiform
> (evenly dilated) does not apply. The implications are different.****
>
>  ****
>
> 1. an eccentric aneurysm places more stress on one wall than on another.
> It may grow more quickly but the risks of rupture are likely a function of
> size.****
>
>  ****
>
> 2. a saccular aneurysm represents another etiology, most often infectious
> or inflammatory.  The three layers of the aortic wall tend not to be
> intact.  It requires very close monitoring at the very least.  The risk of
> rupture/dissection does not necessarily correlate with size.****
>
>  ****
>
> The term "eccentric" has been extensively used in the angiographic
> literature and adopted for MRA and CTA.  The presence of an eccentric
> aneurysm may indicate an evolving saccular aneurysm but not necessarily.**
> **
>
>  ****
>
> Joseph F. Polak MD, MPH****
>
> Professor of Radiology****
>
> Tufts University School of Medicine****
>
> Vice-Chair of Business Development****
>
> Tufts Medical Center****
>
> 800 Washington Street****
>
> Boston MA 02111****
>
> Chief of Radiology****
>
> Lemuel Shattuck Hospital****
>
> 170 Morton Street****
>
> Jamaica Plain MA 02130****
>
> ** **
>
> ** **
>
> Tish Poe****
>
> ** **
>
> *From:* UVM Flownet [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On Behalf Of *Katrina
> Allison
> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 03, 2012 12:58 PM
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Subject:* Re: Eccentric Aortic Aneurysms****
>
> ** **
>
> No there is such a thing as an eccentric aortic aneurysm.  I wasn’t aware
> of this until last month when I went to the IAME vascular conference in
> Washington D.C and they discussed this. ****
>
> ** **
>
> >
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