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Interesting!
At our feeders here along Arrowhead Lake, we have had an abundance 
(compared to past years) of Mourning Doves.  Not as many as Maeve, the 
highest number has been 22.  However, we have only had fleeting flocks 
of between 40-73 Redpolls staying for about an hour or so and than 
leaving, returning several days later and leaving. Almost like they are 
saying, "We'll be back when you refill the feeders."  Our Tree Sparrow 
numbers are up significantly this year compared to past years along with 
periodic increases in our winter resident Junco population.  What's fun, 
at least to me,  is keeping track of how each year is different!

I think with what has been discovered so far concerning the genetics/DNA 
of Redpolls, the taxonomists will lump!  The bane of listers! <G>

Dick Harlow
Milton


On 1/24/13 7:16 AM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> Good morning, everyone - For some reason I've been having unusually high numbers of Mourning Doves at my feeders, regularly 15-20 and up to 45 (!!) one morning. There's no corn in the seed mix and I don't scatter seed on the ground. The doves are hanging out under the feeders that the ravenous redpolls use; they're also teetering on a large tube feeder with a tray that holds nothing but safflower seed. (The doves appear to have a night roost among grape vines at the back of my property, which they use during the summer also.)
>
> As for redpolls, I took a photo of what I think "is" a Hoary along with a Common, which is posted in the third row down at
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/86960264@N05/
>
> The bird in the middle of the photo has a frosty appearance with thin or missing striping on the sides. However, most times there isn't such a clearly white one - just, as Sibley says, a continuum. The bigger "Greenland" subspecies is darkest and others range from that. It will be interesting to watch over the next couple of years and see if there is indeed scientific agreement that there's only one Redpoll.
>
>
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>