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It was a beautiful morning at Button Bay.  The distant snow covered mountains were a blush of sunrise-pink, and a mystical haze hung farther out over the calm lake in the chill dawn air.  Hundreds and hundreds of Canada Geese were close to shore, so I carefully scanned. each. one. from left of the fishing access all the way to my right as far as I could see.  The two Snow Geese were present, but after checking and rechecking for more than an hour, there wasn't a Greater White-fronted Goose to be seen.  Unwilling to give up just yet,  I stalked the shore and headed north, searching, searching, scrambling down a deep ravine and up the other side and walking nearly as far as I could to where the bay curves west.  Nothing.  Well, not the hoped-for geese at least.  Out beyond the Canada were more hundreds of Common Goldeneyes, Buffleheads, and Common Mergansers, then beyond this "neutral zone", a line of Gulls extended endlessly from north to south across the bay.  After an hour or so, the Canadas began moving out into the bay, then groups began to take off:  some flying south, others flying north, everyone in full honking mode.  Interestingly, this seemed to coincide with the vast line of Gulls coming closer.  The Mallards and Black Ducks also didn't seem too keen about the advancing line.  They began to nervously gather, quacking and swimming closer to shore, some waddling up onto the bank.  I wish I could have stayed all day, but life beckoned and off I left for Grand Isle.  Maybe when I return Sunday the Greater White-fronteds will splash down and I'll finally see them.  But then, maybe not.  It's always a surprise, isn't it?

Kaye
Hinesburg