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Ron's email address at the end of the below message (sent yesterday) is 
incorrect.

The correct address is:  [log in to unmask]

Ian
=======================================
On 3/7/2013 5:45 AM, Ian A. Worley wrote:
> Hello fellow birders,
>
> Spring is just around the corner and we have completed the total 
> updating of Vermont’s hotspots, including the adding of many new 
> hotspots throughout the state.
>
> If you use eBird you know that when submitting a checklist you can 
> select either a “personal” location (one of your own making) or a 
> “hotspot” location (created by eBird). Only you can add additional 
> checklists to your personal locations. However, anyone can add a 
> checklist to a hotspot location.
>
> Hence each hotspot gathers bird information from many different 
> birders. This is the reason eBird wants states like Vermont and 
> countries around the world to add more hotspots. No longer just a 
> location for seeing rare or extraordinarily abundant birds, hotspots 
> also now invite birders to less visited locales, ecosystems, and 
> landscapes.
>
> When you use hotspots to report your birding observations you greatly 
> facilitate the value of your observation at that location. This is 
> because anyone can utilize all the different checklists in the hotspot 
> in creating maps, bar graphs, species lists, graphs, reports, and 
> other analyses. New and out-of-state visitors can use the hotspots to 
> find out what birds to expect, for example. Or you can follow the 
> patterns of certain species through time at that place.
>
> So when you go to submit a checklist, we encourage you to select your 
> location via the “Find it on a Map” function. Look to see if there is 
> a hotspot that serves the area of your birding. If you are a long-time 
> eBirder, you can also use the “Find it on a Map” function to discover 
> the many new hotspots that we’ve created. There are now 813 hotspots 
> statewide!
>
> =======================
> New hotspots have been added around the state at nearly all Vermont 
> State Parks and Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs), at large tracts of 
> land such as the Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, in areas with 
> very little birding (to encourage more birding) such as the thousands 
> of acres of National Forest in southern Vermont, and from the 
> recommendations of numerous birders. Nearly all lakes and ponds over 
> 10 areas in size have hotspots.
>
> Likewise, we have competed assessment and editing of all pre-existing 
> hotspots in Vermont. This includes renaming many for consistency and 
> clarity, adjusting the map location as necessary for accuracy, and 
> consolidating redundant hotspots.
>
> Soon to come – Look for additional information on hotspots and new 
> places to bird in Vermont on the Vermont eBird website “Birding News 
> and Features.”
>
> Thanks for using eBird – and the hotspots!
>
> If you have any questions please contact us:
>
> Ron Payne
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Ian Worley
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Kent McFarland
> [log in to unmask]