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Well spoken,, taken and peace to all.
Denise

Denise Levy

cell 408-391-0837
Saratoga, CA
Ultrasound Professional Credentials
RDMS, RVT, RDCS
General Ultrasound, Vascular &Transcranial Doppler



On Sun, Nov 3, 2013 at 6:53 PM, Audrey Fleming <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> No, you specifically said, "We are having a discussion regarding which field
> of ultrasound is technically more difficult" . My response is that all
> sonography is technically difficult. I know vascular techs that scan a
> bilateral carotid in less than 10 minutes and multi-credentialed general
> sonographers that take 45 minutes to scan an abdomen.
>
> As I said, "Ultrasound is practiced in so many different ways by so many
> different people that it is difficult to identify a general type of
> practice." I do know that everyone tends to think only of their small sphere
> of practice. This may lead to confusion when you get responses from people
> who work in a different type practice or who have worked in a variety of
> practice settings.
>
> From: Mary BAZZI <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Sunday, November 3, 2013 9:26 PM
>
> Subject: Re: General Ultrasound Vs Vascular Ultrasound
>
> We are alittle confused.  Our team of general and vascular techs have great
> respect for what each do for their profession.  As well as the echo tech's.
> No where in our paragraph did we think one was better, quicker, smarter
> etc..... What the discussion was about is mostly time.  General techs will
> have a schedule of at least 1patient every 1/2 hour and the reports will
> indicate normal, cyst noted, AAA etc.  very basic.  Our vascular area stated
> most test are at a minimum of 45 minutes, not including the report which has
> much more documentation. No one was pointing a finger and stating that
> crappy exams are being done. In all ultrasound there are just some patients
> that do not image well.
> So, our point is yes general US needs to know anatomy and image it well.
> Vascular as we will answer mainly to the renal statement, has an important
> role of blood supply and how the kidney images for pathology.  Such as
> stones, cyst etc.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Nov 3, 2013, at 8:40 PM, vasc1 <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> Very nicely stated
>
>
> Dr Jason Roberts
> [log in to unmask]
> 954-801-2496
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Audrey Fleming <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: 11/03/2013 8:21 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: General Ultrasound Vs Vascular Ultrasound
>
>
> I'll chime in here also. I am RDMS in abdomen, ob/gyn, and breast (stopped
> after those cause got tired of paying more and more money to the ARDMS) and
> RVS (as well as RT(R))
>
> It is a fallacy that "general sonographers" are not responsible for reports.
> At every facility I worked at I was required to write a "prelim" report for
> each exam. As a general sonographer (I worked traveling for 13 years) I
> worked at more than one facility where my "prelim" report was required to be
> sent to the ER and the patient was treated off the "prelim" without any
> review by an interpreting physician. I worked at a women's hospital with MFM
> physicians that were not on-site during my shifts. I, again, was required to
> send a "prelim" that the patient was treated from. More than once I sent a
> patient directly to the OR, and then called my MFM physician to let them
> know the situation. I know that radiology patients have been sent to the OR
> from my "prelim" without benefit of any official review or interpretation.
> In all these cases the images were reviewed and a final report was provided
> by an interpreting physician as required by U.S. law. I also know that many
> vascular images I have taken were never looked at by an interpreting
> physician and my vascular lab "prelim" report was in fact a computer
> generated final report signed off without any oversight.
>
> I think it is a mistake to think that "general" sonographers have it easier
> than vasc techs. A good sonographer, whether general, echo, or vascular will
> know more than basic knowledge. I have heard the argument that vascular
> techs shouldn't really be doing any abdominal work because they have no idea
> what renal pathology looks like, or liver masses, or enlarged lymph nodes
> etc., etc., etc.. I have heard that the radiology department does crappy
> vascular exams at 3am when the only vascular exams they do are at 3am
> because the vascular lab won't cover overnight call (the reasons for this
> are a different conversation ).Now that the echo people are doing more and
> more vascular work (are they cherry picking the paying cases????) this
> conversation can be extrapolated to include them.
>
> Ultrasound is practiced in so many different ways by so many different
> people that it is difficult to identify a general type of practice. I won't
> even start with the statement "The question however, is when performing
> general ultrasound, the tech must demonstrate anatomy.  Such as gall
> bladders, spleens, kidneys etc. a full abdominal exam takes about 25
> minutes." That is another conversation IMO.
>
> My very long winded diatribe is to say this: If we cannot agree to respect
> one another as a global group of sonographers, then don't be surprised when
> no one will stick up for anyone. Instead of asking who's bigger, better,
> faster, taller, smarter, etc., etc., etc., shouldn't we be working together
> to make sure that the individuals we know are capable and can meet minimum
> standards? Then we can be happy when those standards are exceeded by anyone
> who performs any type of ultrasound modality.
>
> Audrey
>
> From: Mary BAZZI <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Sunday, November 3, 2013 2:25 PM
> Subject: Re: General Ultrasound Vs Vascular Ultrasound
>
> We are having a discussion regarding which field of ultrasound is
> technically more difficult.  We realize that both are very tech dependent.
> The question however, is when performing general ultrasound, the tech must
> demonstrate anatomy.  Such as gall bladders, spleens, kidneys etc. a full
> abdominal exam takes about 25 minutes. They are not responsible for the
> report, they are dictated by the reading physician.
> A vascular exam is much more tech dependent, having to know not only anatomy
> but blood flow patterns, direction and velocities.  So we decided to ask for
> a poll on which, however both are important in their own sense is more
> technically challenging.
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
>
>
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