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Winter range of white-throated sparrow extends up to just south of VT on 
range maps, so it should be OK.  Some males of many species stop short 
in their southward migration or don't migrate at all so they can be 
first to claim the best spots on the breeding grounds before the others 
make it back.  It's a gamble, but pays off often enough for the behavior 
to persist in the population.

Baltimore oriole, though, is a primarily insect-eating bird whose normal 
wintering grounds are Central America, and only Florida and the coastal 
areas of the Southeast in N. America.


Jane
(Shoreham)


On 12/15/2013 11:25 AM, Martha McClintock wrote:
> I am starting to feel rather sad when I hear these tales.   Will this
> oriole make it through winter, will he/she eventually go south, or is
> he/she likely doomed?
>
> I have a young white-throated sparrow at my feeder that I was worried about
> for a week but the eBird map shows that there are a number of them in
> Vermont so he may be fine.
>
> Martha
> Westford
>
>
> On Sun, Dec 15, 2013 at 10:37 AM, Sandy Witherell <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> On this very snowy and cold December morning, a feisty female/immature
>> Baltimore Oriole held its own amongst goldfinches, house finches,
>> cardinals, etc. on a very busy platform feeder. Wonder what migration
>> instincts seemingly never made it into its genes......
>>
>> Happy Holidays!
>>
>> Sandy Witherell, Shoreham
>>
>
>
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