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Sure. What's the worst that you can do? Screw it up and then take it to the
shop. Remember:

1) You care more about your skis than any shop will.
2) Cut twice, then measure once.


On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 4:19 AM, John Bonin <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> This is great.  Thanks.
> Would you recommend trying this for the first time on a pair of skis that
> you care about?
>
> "Experience is something that you get, just after you need it."
>
>
> On Fri, Jan 17, 2014 at 11:08 PM, Brian M. Waters <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> Seems relevant about now.
>>
>> 1. Ski over a rock.
>> 2. If the gouge is all the way into the laminate, or if the base is
>> sufficiently damaged, consider removing a chunk of it with an exacto
>> knife.
>> 3. Next, you should do some surface prep. I don't know how commonly
>> anyone really does this on skis, but it's very important any time
>> you're doing any kind of bonding, ever.
>>     a) Clean the area with acetone or a similar solvent.
>>     b) Scuff it up a bit with some sandpaper. (Maybe ~120 grit.)
>>     c) Clean the dust out with another swipe of your favorite solvent.
>>     d) Don't touch it with your grimy paws or let it sit out too long
>> before going to the next step.
>> 4. Grab some Metalgrip (for core shots) or P-Tex (for scratches) from
>> a site like tognar.com. If you want to do it right, don't bother with
>> drip candles.
>> 5. Get your hands on either a soldering iron with a nice fat tip, or a
>> regular ironing iron that can be turned up really high. (I haven't
>> tried, but I don't think a ski waxing iron will get hot enough to melt
>> P-Tex.) Make sure you get all the wax off if you're using an iron.
>> 6. Take a chunk of metalgrip or P-Tex, put it down on top of the
>> repair, and squash that sucker down flat with your iron. Make sure it
>> gets real nice and melty hot, like the delicious melty chocolate on a
>> Waffle Haus treat, but also be careful not to damage your bases.
>> 7. Let it cool. Make sure it cools aaaaaall the way down to room
>> temperature before you finish the repair. If you don't, you might rip
>> it out.
>> 8. Take some higher-grit sandpaper (I think I used 600 last time) and
>> get rid if the excess gunk. A sanding block will help you keep your
>> base flat. Here's where I may differ with a lot of other folks who are
>> concerned with messing up their base pattern. Some people like to use
>> a steel scraper, but don't try thus until you get it pretty nice and
>> flat first, because you can rip the repair right out.
>> 9. Ski over a rock.
>> 10. Go back to step 1.
>>
>> - BW
>>
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>
>
>
> --
> *John Bonin*
>
>
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